Discussion:
"Under Saddam, it was 100 percent safe.
(demasiado antiguo para responder)
torresD
2003-08-22 18:44:04 UTC
Permalink
"Many families are afraid to send their
daughters to school because people
will kidnap them," said Saad Hashem,
a 38-year-old father of four daughters.

"Under Saddam, it was 100 percent safe.

We could come home at 1 or 2 a.m.;
police were everywhere."
http://www.commondreams.org/headlines03/0819-04.htm

Published on Tuesday, August 4, 2003 by the Boston Globe
Iraqi Women Recoiling in Fear of Crime
by Susan Milligan

BAGHDAD --

Iraqi women, frightened by reports
of a rash of kidnappings and rapes,
are staying indoors, avoiding school,
and donning veils, frustrating those
who hoped that the collapse of
Saddam Hussein's regime would
usher in a new era of freedom and
greater equality for women.

Coalition authorities and local police do not
keep statistics on kidnappings and rapes of
girls and women, crimes a local women's
group says occur 20 times a day across the
country now that the harsh punishments meted
out by Hussein's regime are no longer a threat
to criminals.

Whether the stories are real or exaggerated,
however, Iraqi women say they no longer
shop alone or go out at night --
activities they say they felt
perfectly safe doing under Hussein's rule.

Many families say they are afraid to
send their daughters to school or work,
and some women are reluctantly wearing
veils to avoid tempting gangsters who
prey on young women,

said Hadil Jawad of the Organization
of Women's Freedom in Iraq.

When women came to the office for a
weekly organizing meeting, they covered
their heads, Jawad said.

"I said,

`Why do you cover your head?
You are free.'

They said they had to cover their heads
`so [criminals] would not kidnap us.' "

The rapes have spurred a jump in "honor killings,"
she said, in which a father or husband kills a raped
woman because of the "shame" her victimization
has brought on the family.

Human Rights Watch, in a recent report,
identified 25 credible cases of kidnappings
or rapes of women in the postwar period.

Jawad said the number is much higher,
as many as 20 a day, and Iraqis say they
believe the crime is rampant now that
there is little security.

Both activists and police officers, however,
agree that the crime is likely to be dramatically
underreported, since Muslim Iraqi women may
fear rejection or violence from their families.

A woman
"cannot say anything or come to tell us.

When they grab her, you know what they do with her,"

said Ahmad Assimil, an Iraqi police officer.

"For the Iraqi people, it's shameful, so she keeps silent."

Women endured repression under Hussein's regime,
both as Iraqi citizens in general and as women,
said Hind Wasfi Tahir of the Iraqi Women's League.

A woman could not travel outside
the country without a brother, father,
or husband to escort her,
and attackers could avoid
prosecution for rape by marrying
their victims, Jawad said.

Women are now revealing cases of workplace
sexual harassment during the Hussein era,
she said, and honor killings were largely
overlooked.

Women and girls also were
unable to avoid sexual assault, Tahir said.

"The Ba'ath regime had groups that
kidnapped young girls and young women,
but nobody heard about it," she said.

Female activists had hoped that the new
Iraq would have room for a greater voice
for women in politics and society.

The new Governing Council includes three women.

And while two of the three choose to wear headscarfs,
Jawad said, the inclusion of women on the council marks
a dramatic step forward.

The Iraqi Women's League, in existence since 1952,
is growing bigger and stronger since the fall of Hussein,
Tahir said.

The Organization of Women's Freedom in Iraq
-- closely aligned with groups critical of the postwar
situation in Iraq -- recently expanded from a base in Kurdistan,
and is planning a demonstration next Monday in front of the
Coalition Provisional Authority office, a tactic that would
have been too risky when Hussein was in power.

The fear of rape, however,
is keeping women away from opportunities
they might have in the new Iraq, activists and
Iraqi citizens say.

The stories quickly make the rounds around
Baghdad: the 9-year-old girl who was kidnapped
and raped, and the young woman whose family
paid a ransom to have her released,
but who committed suicide because
she was ashamed of no longer being a virgin.

Jawad told of a young woman who
was in a taxi when three men in a black
car tried to pry her out of the back seat.

The taxi driver managed to speed away,
thwarting the abduction, she said.

"There is no safety in the streets.

If I want to go anywhere, I take my sons with me,"
said Dunia Kamen, 36.

"We hoped for more freedom for women,
but we are disappointed in the situation.

We hope it is temporary."

"We were very happy when the regime collapsed,"
said Karama Abdusallam.

But with the rising danger of rapes and kidnapping,
Abdusallam said her daughter no longer goes to
work because the family cannot handle the burden
of assuring her safety during her commute.

"Under Saddam, we were only afraid of Uday,"
said Abdusallam's daughter, Zeman Arkan,
referring to Hussein's oldest son.

"Now, it's worse than under Saddam.
There's no security for us."

Families are also reluctant to send their
daughters to school when they reopen.

A Save the Children report in May showed
that attendance at girls' schools had dropped
by more than half, largely because parents
didn't want to send their daughters out of the home.

"Many families are afraid to send their
daughters to school because people
will kidnap them," said Saad Hashem,
a 38-year-old father of four daughters.

"Under Saddam, it was 100 percent safe.

We could come home at 1 or 2 a.m.;
police were everywhere."

American soldiers once came to his
daughter's school to protect it when the
girls were taking exams,
but they left soon afterward, Hashem said.

"There is no safety now.

The police don't have any power to protect us," he said.

Women's groups hope to open shelters for
victims afraid to go home to their families,
but they don't have the money to do so.

Colonel Guy Shields, spokesman for the
coalition forces, said he had no information
about reports of rapes and kidnappings.

"The military is not keeping track
of Iraqi criminal statistics," he said.

L. Paul Bremer III, the head of the civilian
Coalition Provisional Authority, said Iraqi
police had broken up two kidnapping rings.

Ahmed Ibrahim, the new deputy interior minister,
said that the kidnappings were a problem but
said police had arrested "a great number"
of the perpetrators.

"We must be able to let women and
children go to the market, the parks," he said.

Salman Abdul Kaleem, a local police colonel,
said he had heard no reports of kidnappings
of women, and said women would feel comfortable
reporting such crimes to the authorities.

"Nothing has happened like that," Kaleem said.

Individuals on Kaleem's police force disagree,
however, saying they have heard of many reports
in their own neighborhoods of women and girls
being nabbed and raped.

"We can do nothing.

I cannot protect them,"
said vice officer Adeal Alwin.

"When I finish my duty here, I don't feel safe going home."
Rafael H. Perez Roura
2003-08-22 21:20:52 UTC
Permalink
Consider that before the siblings Qusay and Uday assumed room
teeemperatureit is very likely that the "former" Hussein's finger fucked
this TorRes gal while she moaned like a female lesbian camel .
They only had to be concerned with one of Saddam's son's (you know the
wackiest son) who was known to order the kidnapping of young girls which
he
then he raped and then returned to their parents with warnings to keep
shut
or else.
By the way, you must be such a nice person! You must be a freak!
ahlahan
2003-08-23 01:37:45 UTC
Permalink
LOL
Post by Rafael H. Perez Roura
Consider that before the siblings Qusay and Uday assumed room
teeemperatureit is very likely that the "former" Hussein's finger fucked
this TorRes gal while she moaned like a female lesbian camel .
They only had to be concerned with one of Saddam's son's (you know the
wackiest son) who was known to order the kidnapping of young girls which
he
then he raped and then returned to their parents with warnings to keep
shut
or else.
By the way, you must be such a nice person! You must be a freak!
redflag
2003-08-22 22:20:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rafael H. Perez Roura
Consider that before the siblings Qusay and Uday assumed room
teeemperatureit is very likely that the "former" Hussein's finger fucked
this TorRes gal while she moaned like a female lesbian camel .
You know, you're a filthy-mouthed scoundrel. Now I'm
completely sure you're related to Cuban radio gusano
Armando Perez Roura. When did you run away from Cuba?
--
"Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
with criticism of existing property relations."

"All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
of human nature."

You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
our web page at http://www.slp.org
ahlahan
2003-08-23 05:35:45 UTC
Permalink
And youre a pinko commie asshole señor. Why arent you running away to
Kastroland? You dumb fuck!
Post by redflag
Post by Rafael H. Perez Roura
Consider that before the siblings Qusay and Uday assumed room
teeemperatureit is very likely that the "former" Hussein's finger fucked
this TorRes gal while she moaned like a female lesbian camel .
You know, you're a filthy-mouthed scoundrel. Now I'm
completely sure you're related to Cuban radio gusano
Armando Perez Roura. When did you run away from Cuba?
--
"Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
with criticism of existing property relations."
"All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
of human nature."
You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
our web page at http://www.slp.org
Baby Bathwater
2003-08-23 05:47:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by ahlahan
And youre a pinko commie asshole señor. Why arent you running away to
Kastroland? You dumb fuck!
Because I don't feel like it. Does that answer you question?
Rafael H. Perez Roura
2003-08-23 09:36:17 UTC
Permalink
Because he is a dumb fuck. Are you kidding this spittoon has gotten used to
eating three square meals a day with snacks, drinks and smokes. He would
have no such luxury in "Cuber" where even food is on the black market and
the place is dotted with illegal underground restaurants. This pinko goes
to Red Lobster to stuff his belly.
Post by ahlahan
And youre a pinko commie asshole señor. Why arent you running away to
Kastroland? You dumb fuck!
Post by redflag
Post by Rafael H. Perez Roura
Consider that before the siblings Qusay and Uday assumed room
teeemperatureit is very likely that the "former" Hussein's finger
fucked
Post by redflag
Post by Rafael H. Perez Roura
this TorRes gal while she moaned like a female lesbian camel .
You know, you're a filthy-mouthed scoundrel. Now I'm
completely sure you're related to Cuban radio gusano
Armando Perez Roura. When did you run away from Cuba?
--
"Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
with criticism of existing property relations."
"All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
of human nature."
You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
our web page at http://www.slp.org
Baby Bathwater
2003-08-24 05:55:14 UTC
Permalink
Is that why *you* ran away from Cuba, because you couldn't stuff your
belly?
That isn't a good enough reason? Don't tell me you starve yourself here in
compassion with your Cuban comrades.
No Cuban that came to the U.S. solely for economic reasons has a
right to claim he was pesrsecuted politically. If they do, as Mr. Perez Roura
seems to claim, then they're liars and hypocrites.

Mind you, I don't deny that many, if not most Cubans leave their
country in hopes of a better life elsewhere. Moreover, I agree that
some, though not most Cubans leave exclusively for political reasons.

But those who leave Cuba, unless they're willing to return to fight and make
sacrifices to see a change there, should not incite others to do what
they themselves had no courage to do when they had the chance.

I respect everyone's right to go wherever and whenever they want to
go. But I will not remain silent when those who left or those who
wish make political capital from those who left make false claims
about the reasons they left.
J R-S
2003-08-23 16:53:00 UTC
Permalink
El no tiene madre, es hijo natural de padre solamente.

jrs
Here is a fine example of Mr. Red Ass, that out of jealousy mostly due
to
lack of attention, is confessing that he shared with the TorRes chick
the
Hussein Brothers knuckles, but up his BUTT.
Do you kiss your mother with the same mouth you utter that filth?
--
"Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
with criticism of existing property relations."
"All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
of human nature."
You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
our web page at http://www.slp.org
Super Duty
2003-08-23 12:38:04 UTC
Permalink
Pinko, you are but a small man of many names.
redflag
2003-08-23 13:44:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Super Duty
Pinko, you are but a small man of many names.
You must be thinking of someone else. Maybe Mr. Rotomayor Cagon who
now finds himself in very hot waters precisely for being small,
bearing many names and using the internet at work to say horrible
things. Now there's a small man with big problems!
--
"Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
with criticism of existing property relations."

"All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
of human nature."

You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
our web page at http://www.slp.org
J R-S
2003-08-22 23:46:33 UTC
Permalink
¿Son esos deseos reprimidos o complejos de persecución?

jrs
Post by Rafael H. Perez Roura
Consider that before the siblings Qusay and Uday assumed room
teeemperatureit is very likely that the "former" Hussein's finger fucked
this TorRes gal while she moaned like a female lesbian camel .
They only had to be concerned with one of Saddam's son's (you know the
wackiest son) who was known to order the kidnapping of young girls which
he
then he raped and then returned to their parents with warnings to keep
shut
or else.
By the way, you must be such a nice person! You must be a freak!
Observador
2003-08-22 21:53:45 UTC
Permalink
Just like in North Korea, the country less likeley to have civil unrest.
Post by torresD
"Many families are afraid to send their
daughters to school because people
will kidnap them," said Saad Hashem,
a 38-year-old father of four daughters.
"Under Saddam, it was 100 percent safe.
We could come home at 1 or 2 a.m.;
police were everywhere."
http://www.commondreams.org/headlines03/0819-04.htm
Published on Tuesday, August 4, 2003 by the Boston Globe
Iraqi Women Recoiling in Fear of Crime
by Susan Milligan
BAGHDAD --
Iraqi women, frightened by reports
of a rash of kidnappings and rapes,
are staying indoors, avoiding school,
and donning veils, frustrating those
who hoped that the collapse of
Saddam Hussein's regime would
usher in a new era of freedom and
greater equality for women.
Coalition authorities and local police do not
keep statistics on kidnappings and rapes of
girls and women, crimes a local women's
group says occur 20 times a day across the
country now that the harsh punishments meted
out by Hussein's regime are no longer a threat
to criminals.
Whether the stories are real or exaggerated,
however, Iraqi women say they no longer
shop alone or go out at night --
activities they say they felt
perfectly safe doing under Hussein's rule.
Many families say they are afraid to
send their daughters to school or work,
and some women are reluctantly wearing
veils to avoid tempting gangsters who
prey on young women,
said Hadil Jawad of the Organization
of Women's Freedom in Iraq.
When women came to the office for a
weekly organizing meeting, they covered
their heads, Jawad said.
"I said,
`Why do you cover your head?
You are free.'
They said they had to cover their heads
`so [criminals] would not kidnap us.' "
The rapes have spurred a jump in "honor killings,"
she said, in which a father or husband kills a raped
woman because of the "shame" her victimization
has brought on the family.
Human Rights Watch, in a recent report,
identified 25 credible cases of kidnappings
or rapes of women in the postwar period.
Jawad said the number is much higher,
as many as 20 a day, and Iraqis say they
believe the crime is rampant now that
there is little security.
Both activists and police officers, however,
agree that the crime is likely to be dramatically
underreported, since Muslim Iraqi women may
fear rejection or violence from their families.
A woman
"cannot say anything or come to tell us.
When they grab her, you know what they do with her,"
said Ahmad Assimil, an Iraqi police officer.
"For the Iraqi people, it's shameful, so she keeps silent."
Women endured repression under Hussein's regime,
both as Iraqi citizens in general and as women,
said Hind Wasfi Tahir of the Iraqi Women's League.
A woman could not travel outside
the country without a brother, father,
or husband to escort her,
and attackers could avoid
prosecution for rape by marrying
their victims, Jawad said.
Women are now revealing cases of workplace
sexual harassment during the Hussein era,
she said, and honor killings were largely
overlooked.
Women and girls also were
unable to avoid sexual assault, Tahir said.
"The Ba'ath regime had groups that
kidnapped young girls and young women,
but nobody heard about it," she said.
Female activists had hoped that the new
Iraq would have room for a greater voice
for women in politics and society.
The new Governing Council includes three women.
And while two of the three choose to wear headscarfs,
Jawad said, the inclusion of women on the council marks
a dramatic step forward.
The Iraqi Women's League, in existence since 1952,
is growing bigger and stronger since the fall of Hussein,
Tahir said.
The Organization of Women's Freedom in Iraq
-- closely aligned with groups critical of the postwar
situation in Iraq -- recently expanded from a base in Kurdistan,
and is planning a demonstration next Monday in front of the
Coalition Provisional Authority office, a tactic that would
have been too risky when Hussein was in power.
The fear of rape, however,
is keeping women away from opportunities
they might have in the new Iraq, activists and
Iraqi citizens say.
The stories quickly make the rounds around
Baghdad: the 9-year-old girl who was kidnapped
and raped, and the young woman whose family
paid a ransom to have her released,
but who committed suicide because
she was ashamed of no longer being a virgin.
Jawad told of a young woman who
was in a taxi when three men in a black
car tried to pry her out of the back seat.
The taxi driver managed to speed away,
thwarting the abduction, she said.
"There is no safety in the streets.
If I want to go anywhere, I take my sons with me,"
said Dunia Kamen, 36.
"We hoped for more freedom for women,
but we are disappointed in the situation.
We hope it is temporary."
"We were very happy when the regime collapsed,"
said Karama Abdusallam.
But with the rising danger of rapes and kidnapping,
Abdusallam said her daughter no longer goes to
work because the family cannot handle the burden
of assuring her safety during her commute.
"Under Saddam, we were only afraid of Uday,"
said Abdusallam's daughter, Zeman Arkan,
referring to Hussein's oldest son.
"Now, it's worse than under Saddam.
There's no security for us."
Families are also reluctant to send their
daughters to school when they reopen.
A Save the Children report in May showed
that attendance at girls' schools had dropped
by more than half, largely because parents
didn't want to send their daughters out of the home.
"Many families are afraid to send their
daughters to school because people
will kidnap them," said Saad Hashem,
a 38-year-old father of four daughters.
"Under Saddam, it was 100 percent safe.
We could come home at 1 or 2 a.m.;
police were everywhere."
American soldiers once came to his
daughter's school to protect it when the
girls were taking exams,
but they left soon afterward, Hashem said.
"There is no safety now.
The police don't have any power to protect us," he said.
Women's groups hope to open shelters for
victims afraid to go home to their families,
but they don't have the money to do so.
Colonel Guy Shields, spokesman for the
coalition forces, said he had no information
about reports of rapes and kidnappings.
"The military is not keeping track
of Iraqi criminal statistics," he said.
L. Paul Bremer III, the head of the civilian
Coalition Provisional Authority, said Iraqi
police had broken up two kidnapping rings.
Ahmed Ibrahim, the new deputy interior minister,
said that the kidnappings were a problem but
said police had arrested "a great number"
of the perpetrators.
"We must be able to let women and
children go to the market, the parks," he said.
Salman Abdul Kaleem, a local police colonel,
said he had heard no reports of kidnappings
of women, and said women would feel comfortable
reporting such crimes to the authorities.
"Nothing has happened like that," Kaleem said.
Individuals on Kaleem's police force disagree,
however, saying they have heard of many reports
in their own neighborhoods of women and girls
being nabbed and raped.
"We can do nothing.
I cannot protect them,"
said vice officer Adeal Alwin.
"When I finish my duty here, I don't feel safe going home."
ahlahan
2003-08-23 01:39:52 UTC
Permalink
That is probably why she posts this bullshit, she didnt get a chance to get
gang banged in public by the Saddam & Sons
They only had to be concerned with one of Saddam's son's (you know the
wackiest son) who was known to order the kidnapping of young girls which
he
then he raped and then returned to their parents with warnings to keep
shut
or else.
By the way, you must be such a nice person! You must be a freak!
Baby Bathwater
2003-08-24 05:57:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by ahlahan
That is probably why she posts this bullshit, she didnt get a chance to get
gang banged in public by the Saddam & Sons
And so may we presume that the reason you don't post
that "bullshit" is because _you_ got "gang-banged" by
Saddam & Sons?

You seem like a satisfied customer.
TDC
2003-08-22 23:53:59 UTC
Permalink
Hola

No lo puedo creer... a la verdad que usted es un caso...... estas tan
atolondrada que tus ideas anti-americanas te han atrofiado la riboflamina
en ese cerebro... para poner este falso reporte.... ridiculo.
tergiversador....... ya no vale la pena continuar leyendo tus "post"...

Saludos
TDC


"torresD"
manny v
2003-08-23 19:18:48 UTC
Permalink
My Dear Lady,
Please visit a psychiatrist at your first opportunity. Better yet, a brain
surgeon might be better prepared to reattach the brain that came out of your
ass.

Merely a suggestion.
Post by torresD
"Many families are afraid to send their
daughters to school because people
will kidnap them," said Saad Hashem,
a 38-year-old father of four daughters.
"Under Saddam, it was 100 percent safe.
We could come home at 1 or 2 a.m.;
police were everywhere."
http://www.commondreams.org/headlines03/0819-04.htm
Published on Tuesday, August 4, 2003 by the Boston Globe
Iraqi Women Recoiling in Fear of Crime
by Susan Milligan
BAGHDAD --
Iraqi women, frightened by reports
of a rash of kidnappings and rapes,
are staying indoors, avoiding school,
and donning veils, frustrating those
who hoped that the collapse of
Saddam Hussein's regime would
usher in a new era of freedom and
greater equality for women.
Coalition authorities and local police do not
keep statistics on kidnappings and rapes of
girls and women, crimes a local women's
group says occur 20 times a day across the
country now that the harsh punishments meted
out by Hussein's regime are no longer a threat
to criminals.
Whether the stories are real or exaggerated,
however, Iraqi women say they no longer
shop alone or go out at night --
activities they say they felt
perfectly safe doing under Hussein's rule.
Many families say they are afraid to
send their daughters to school or work,
and some women are reluctantly wearing
veils to avoid tempting gangsters who
prey on young women,
said Hadil Jawad of the Organization
of Women's Freedom in Iraq.
When women came to the office for a
weekly organizing meeting, they covered
their heads, Jawad said.
"I said,
`Why do you cover your head?
You are free.'
They said they had to cover their heads
`so [criminals] would not kidnap us.' "
The rapes have spurred a jump in "honor killings,"
she said, in which a father or husband kills a raped
woman because of the "shame" her victimization
has brought on the family.
Human Rights Watch, in a recent report,
identified 25 credible cases of kidnappings
or rapes of women in the postwar period.
Jawad said the number is much higher,
as many as 20 a day, and Iraqis say they
believe the crime is rampant now that
there is little security.
Both activists and police officers, however,
agree that the crime is likely to be dramatically
underreported, since Muslim Iraqi women may
fear rejection or violence from their families.
A woman
"cannot say anything or come to tell us.
When they grab her, you know what they do with her,"
said Ahmad Assimil, an Iraqi police officer.
"For the Iraqi people, it's shameful, so she keeps silent."
Women endured repression under Hussein's regime,
both as Iraqi citizens in general and as women,
said Hind Wasfi Tahir of the Iraqi Women's League.
A woman could not travel outside
the country without a brother, father,
or husband to escort her,
and attackers could avoid
prosecution for rape by marrying
their victims, Jawad said.
Women are now revealing cases of workplace
sexual harassment during the Hussein era,
she said, and honor killings were largely
overlooked.
Women and girls also were
unable to avoid sexual assault, Tahir said.
"The Ba'ath regime had groups that
kidnapped young girls and young women,
but nobody heard about it," she said.
Female activists had hoped that the new
Iraq would have room for a greater voice
for women in politics and society.
The new Governing Council includes three women.
And while two of the three choose to wear headscarfs,
Jawad said, the inclusion of women on the council marks
a dramatic step forward.
The Iraqi Women's League, in existence since 1952,
is growing bigger and stronger since the fall of Hussein,
Tahir said.
The Organization of Women's Freedom in Iraq
-- closely aligned with groups critical of the postwar
situation in Iraq -- recently expanded from a base in Kurdistan,
and is planning a demonstration next Monday in front of the
Coalition Provisional Authority office, a tactic that would
have been too risky when Hussein was in power.
The fear of rape, however,
is keeping women away from opportunities
they might have in the new Iraq, activists and
Iraqi citizens say.
The stories quickly make the rounds around
Baghdad: the 9-year-old girl who was kidnapped
and raped, and the young woman whose family
paid a ransom to have her released,
but who committed suicide because
she was ashamed of no longer being a virgin.
Jawad told of a young woman who
was in a taxi when three men in a black
car tried to pry her out of the back seat.
The taxi driver managed to speed away,
thwarting the abduction, she said.
"There is no safety in the streets.
If I want to go anywhere, I take my sons with me,"
said Dunia Kamen, 36.
"We hoped for more freedom for women,
but we are disappointed in the situation.
We hope it is temporary."
"We were very happy when the regime collapsed,"
said Karama Abdusallam.
But with the rising danger of rapes and kidnapping,
Abdusallam said her daughter no longer goes to
work because the family cannot handle the burden
of assuring her safety during her commute.
"Under Saddam, we were only afraid of Uday,"
said Abdusallam's daughter, Zeman Arkan,
referring to Hussein's oldest son.
"Now, it's worse than under Saddam.
There's no security for us."
Families are also reluctant to send their
daughters to school when they reopen.
A Save the Children report in May showed
that attendance at girls' schools had dropped
by more than half, largely because parents
didn't want to send their daughters out of the home.
"Many families are afraid to send their
daughters to school because people
will kidnap them," said Saad Hashem,
a 38-year-old father of four daughters.
"Under Saddam, it was 100 percent safe.
We could come home at 1 or 2 a.m.;
police were everywhere."
American soldiers once came to his
daughter's school to protect it when the
girls were taking exams,
but they left soon afterward, Hashem said.
"There is no safety now.
The police don't have any power to protect us," he said.
Women's groups hope to open shelters for
victims afraid to go home to their families,
but they don't have the money to do so.
Colonel Guy Shields, spokesman for the
coalition forces, said he had no information
about reports of rapes and kidnappings.
"The military is not keeping track
of Iraqi criminal statistics," he said.
L. Paul Bremer III, the head of the civilian
Coalition Provisional Authority, said Iraqi
police had broken up two kidnapping rings.
Ahmed Ibrahim, the new deputy interior minister,
said that the kidnappings were a problem but
said police had arrested "a great number"
of the perpetrators.
"We must be able to let women and
children go to the market, the parks," he said.
Salman Abdul Kaleem, a local police colonel,
said he had heard no reports of kidnappings
of women, and said women would feel comfortable
reporting such crimes to the authorities.
"Nothing has happened like that," Kaleem said.
Individuals on Kaleem's police force disagree,
however, saying they have heard of many reports
in their own neighborhoods of women and girls
being nabbed and raped.
"We can do nothing.
I cannot protect them,"
said vice officer Adeal Alwin.
"When I finish my duty here, I don't feel safe going home."
Baby Bathwater
2003-08-24 06:00:39 UTC
Permalink
Post by manny v
My Dear Lady,
Please visit a psychiatrist at your first opportunity. Better yet, a brain
surgeon might be better prepared to reattach the brain that came out of your
ass.
Merely a suggestion.
I have an even better idea: While she's at the brain surgeon's, maybe
she can ask him where he left your brain?

Another mere suggestion.
manny v
2003-08-24 11:38:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Baby Bathwater
Post by manny v
My Dear Lady,
Please visit a psychiatrist at your first opportunity. Better yet, a brain
surgeon might be better prepared to reattach the brain that came out of your
ass.
Merely a suggestion.
I have an even better idea: While she's at the brain surgeon's, maybe
she can ask him where he left your brain?
Another mere suggestion.
Not to worry, mine is safely stashed away in my tool shed, where I can
occassionally go see it. On the other hand, yours however, my dear
unoriginal friend, is firmly planted in your colon.
redflag
2003-08-24 19:01:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by manny v
Not to worry, mine is safely stashed away in my tool shed, where I can
occassionally go see it. On the other hand, yours however, my dear
unoriginal friend, is firmly planted in your colon.
That which you call your "brain" is actually a skid mark
on an old toilet seat you coudn't part with. Thus the frequent
anal and colonic references.
--
"Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
with criticism of existing property relations."

"All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
of human nature."

You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
our web page at http://www.slp.org
manny v
2003-08-25 01:17:27 UTC
Permalink
Redfag,
Does your moronic name make reference to your political tendencies? As far
as I can tell from yoor writings, you are an ignorant, semi-illiterate
redneck originating from a poor hardscrabble sharecroppers half-acre from a
region where first cousins frequently marry. Does your family tree fork or
does your family prefer to keep the bloodlines pure?
Post by redflag
Post by manny v
Not to worry, mine is safely stashed away in my tool shed, where I can
occassionally go see it. On the other hand, yours however, my dear
unoriginal friend, is firmly planted in your colon.
That which you call your "brain" is actually a skid mark
on an old toilet seat you coudn't part with. Thus the frequent
anal and colonic references.
--
"Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
with criticism of existing property relations."
"All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
of human nature."
You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
our web page at http://www.slp.org
J R-S
2003-08-25 01:54:56 UTC
Permalink
lol
I don't think Red is from the Apalachians or the Rockies nor I think he is
from a trailer park or the Royal family. I think that redflag belongs to a
proud cast of people who has beaten the strongest military in the world
today with only our dignity and civil desobedience.

Dear, whom ever you are, we Puerto Rican INDEPENDENTISTAS had shown your
country a lesson.
Check the picture in this website and think about what happened.
http://www.planetquake.com/madhouse/quake3.htm

jrs
Post by manny v
Redfag,
Does your moronic name make reference to your political tendencies? As far
as I can tell from yoor writings, you are an ignorant, semi-illiterate
redneck originating from a poor hardscrabble sharecroppers half-acre from a
region where first cousins frequently marry. Does your family tree fork or
does your family prefer to keep the bloodlines pure?
Post by redflag
Post by manny v
Not to worry, mine is safely stashed away in my tool shed, where I can
occassionally go see it. On the other hand, yours however, my dear
unoriginal friend, is firmly planted in your colon.
That which you call your "brain" is actually a skid mark
on an old toilet seat you coudn't part with. Thus the frequent
anal and colonic references.
--
"Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
with criticism of existing property relations."
"All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
of human nature."
You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
our web page at http://www.slp.org
Baby Bathwater
2003-08-25 04:26:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by J R-S
lol
I don't think Red is from the Apalachians or the Rockies nor I think he is
from a trailer park or the Royal family. I think that redflag belongs to a
proud cast of people who has beaten the strongest military in the world
today with only our dignity and civil desobedience.
Our people beat the Dutch, the English and the French when they came
to take over. And even though it may take a little longer, we will beat
the Yankees and one day they too will leave.
J R-S
2003-08-25 12:25:33 UTC
Permalink
lol

You got that right, you are the first one I read speaking the truth.

Yeah, we are in the same side. Please tell your congressmen to stop
receiving bribe money from the stathooder slime.

Yeah, I like you coming forward and writing what you feel.

"Kung-Fu grip on our wallets" that is a good one, still laughing....

Please tell that to the following people when you see them...

AMY
Observador
Super Duty
Anonymous
TDC

These folks say that they are not the ones keeping a Kung-Fu (lol) grip on
your pocket. They say that is because You are going to make them a state.
It is because You want them so bad...

jrs
Post by J R-S
lol
I don't think Red is from the Apalachians or the Rockies nor I think he is
from a trailer park or the Royal family. I think that redflag belongs
to
a
Post by J R-S
proud cast of people who has beaten the strongest military in the world
today with only our dignity and civil desobedience.
Dear, whom ever you are, we Puerto Rican INDEPENDENTISTAS had shown your
country a lesson.
Junior-S,
If you insist on writing in English, please try to improve your grammar.
Correct spelling and tenses would help to get your inane point across all
the better.
As an American, I am on the side of you independentistas. I want us to get
the hell out of your useless little island as soon as we can.
Unfortunately
your compatriots appear hell-bent on keeping a kung-fu grip on our
wallets.
manny v
2003-08-25 13:17:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by J R-S
AMY
Observador
Super Duty
Anonymous
TDC
These folks say that they are not the ones keeping a Kung-Fu (lol) grip on
your pocket. They say that is because You are going to make them a state.
It is because You want them so bad...
Junior-S

Please clarify who the You in your statement refers to. I assume you must
mean the American public, and that it is this public that so badly wants to
make Puerto Rico into the 51st state. I've got news for you...the vast
majority of the American public couldn't care less about Puerto Rico. There
may be some democrats who would like to see that happen because it would be
another state that would more than likely vote democrat, but Puerto Rico
does not appear on the radar screen of most Americans.
manny v
2003-08-25 15:12:05 UTC
Permalink
We, Americans and Puerto
Ricans, are not and will never be the same kind of people.
Amen to that.
Now repeat after me "Please don't send any more welfare checks".
ginzon
2003-08-25 14:46:05 UTC
Permalink
As an American, I am on the side of you independentistas. I want us to get
the hell out of your useless little island as soon as we can.
Unfortunately
your compatriots appear hell-bent on keeping a kung-fu grip on our
wallets.

They'd starve inside of a decade.
J R-S
2003-08-25 15:15:25 UTC
Permalink
So fucking what?
If we starve, we starve. If we do good, we do good.

The thing is to let go of the wallets of guys like Manny V. He is just
claiming what is rightfully his.

I am not scared to be on my own, are you? I bet you are scared to death,
...Oh! Daddy USA is leaving us!
...we can't breath without food stamps!
...man, give me a break, grow up and learn to live life as a responsible
person, whiner!

jrs
Post by J R-S
As an American, I am on the side of you independentistas. I want us to get
the hell out of your useless little island as soon as we can.
Unfortunately
your compatriots appear hell-bent on keeping a kung-fu grip on our
wallets.
They'd starve inside of a decade.
ginzon
2003-08-25 18:22:09 UTC
Permalink
Who's whining??
Post by J R-S
So fucking what?
If we starve, we starve. If we do good, we do good.
The thing is to let go of the wallets of guys like Manny V. He is just
claiming what is rightfully his.
I am not scared to be on my own, are you? I bet you are scared to death,
...Oh! Daddy USA is leaving us!
...we can't breath without food stamps!
...man, give me a break, grow up and learn to live life as a responsible
person, whiner!
jrs
Post by J R-S
As an American, I am on the side of you independentistas. I want us to
get
Post by J R-S
the hell out of your useless little island as soon as we can.
Unfortunately
your compatriots appear hell-bent on keeping a kung-fu grip on our
wallets.
They'd starve inside of a decade.
manny v
2003-08-25 15:26:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by J R-S
As an American, I am on the side of you independentistas. I want us to get
the hell out of your useless little island as soon as we can.
Unfortunately
your compatriots appear hell-bent on keeping a kung-fu grip on our
wallets.
They'd starve inside of a decade.
Maybe not, they may find a vast reservoir of oil lying right below San Juan,
or a brilliant Puerto Rican scientist might discover the cure to the common
cold spurring a huge bio-medical industry, or they might become the foremost
manuacturer of microchips, or any of a number of other possibilities (though
not probabilities). I wish them luck, but quite frankly, I don't give a
damn. Let them become independent if that's what they really want, but also
remind them not to come back crying to mommy when they fall and scrape their
knee.
manny v
2003-08-25 21:56:34 UTC
Permalink
You know they'd end up blaming the US anyway.
That would be no different from most other countries in the world. Everyone
blames the US for everything. Leaky faucet...the US's fault, runny
nose...the US caused it, poor choice in their leaders...we picked them. It's
no wonder that the great majority of Americans could care less about the
rest of the world. It's gets annoying listening to constant whining.
ginzon
2003-08-25 02:00:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by manny v
Redfag,
Does your moronic name make reference to your political tendencies? As far
as I can tell from yoor writings, you are an ignorant, semi-illiterate
redneck originating from a poor hardscrabble sharecroppers half-acre from a
region where first cousins frequently marry. Does your family tree fork or
does your family prefer to keep the bloodlines pure?
Worse than that. He is a self-loathing, underachiever who - last I knew -
had not been able to progress beyond a $15 an hour welding job. Not that
there is anything wrong with welders. We need welders. He is so jealous of
anyone that has achieved more than he and makes more money that he clings to
this dinosaur called Marxism. He dreams of a day when no one will ever have
more than he does. I am certain he feels exploited and trod upon and
certainly hates his employers.

He really is a pathetic creature and is more to be pitied than anything
else. I don't know how anyone with two brain cells to rub together would
support a communist system in this day and age.
Baby Bathwater
2003-08-25 04:05:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by ginzon
Worse than that. He is a self-loathing, underachiever who - last I knew -
had not been able to progress beyond a $15 an hour welding job.
I don't weld. I mean, I _can_ weld but have never held employment
as a welder. For many years I was a layout man. That is, a structural
steel layout man. I was the guy the engineers and architects came to
ask if what they had layed down on paper could be done in real life.

At times, I did much better than $15 an hour. But averaged out over
the 20 or 25 years I spent in that trade, it was slightly more than $15/
hour. That's not too bad, considering that the average hourly rate for
most workers in the U.S. now is about $9/hr.
Post by ginzon
Not that there is anything wrong with welders. We need welders.
Who's "we"? I don't know where you got your info from but, I
insist, I am no welder. Most structural steel welders that I knew
never made my type of wages, even in union shops. That's too
bad, though. Even though a welders job is much easier than mine,
it's still a lot more hazardous. I feel they should have been paid
a lot better.
Post by ginzon
He is so jealous of
anyone that has achieved more than he and makes more money that he clings to
this dinosaur called Marxism.
Who could I possibly be jealous of, you? I don't even know
who you are! For all I know you could be the hooker I passed
by in Ponce de Leon avenue on my way to work. Or worse yet,
you could be Peter W. Miller, a shyster working for corporate
interests in Puerto Rico, someone who advises corporate clients
on how best to get around labor laws and how to beat injured
workers out of their disability claims.
Post by ginzon
He dreams of a day when no one will ever have
more than he does.
Gosh, how could you possibly know that?!? Could it be that
your real name is Peter Miller (aka Pitin)? Maybe that's who
you really are. After all, if I recall, it was he who constatly
accused others of being envious mediocrities merely because
they held differing opinions.
Post by ginzon
I am certain he feels exploited and trod upon and
certainly hates his employers.
How could I possibly hate Doña Sila and el Comandante
Fidel Castro? They are my employers. I love them.
They sign my paychecks. I have nothing but the warmest
regard and admiration for them.
Post by ginzon
He really is a pathetic creature and is more to be pitied than anything
else. I don't know how anyone with two brain cells to rub together would
support a communist system in this day and age.
Now I know why you don't support a communist system. With
only two brain cells to rub together, I suppose it doesn't leave much
for you to think about anything beyond your next meal.

Love,

baby bathwater
ginzon
2003-08-25 07:13:30 UTC
Permalink
So who else were you speaking for? You say that I am
"jealous" of someone that presumably makes more money than
me. Who could that someone be and why would I be jealous
of him?
I said anyone that makes more money than you or is in a better position in
life. Your type is rather typical. Just the fact that you cling to such a
dated and discredited philosophy such as Marxism only proves my point.
manny v
2003-08-25 09:26:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Baby Bathwater
At times, I did much better than $15 an hour. But averaged out over
the 20 or 25 years I spent in that trade, it was slightly more than $15/
hour. That's not too bad, considering that the average hourly rate for
most workers in the U.S. now is about $9/hr.
$15 an hour...impressive. Now, considering the marxist/socialist ideal that
you hold so dear, how much of that did you share with your less fortunate
co-workers? Be honest now.
Post by Baby Bathwater
How could I possibly hate Doña Sila and el Comandante
Fidel Castro? They are my employers. I love them.
They sign my paychecks. I have nothing but the warmest
regard and admiration for them.
Of course you love them, you said it yourself...they sign your paychecks.
Hey I get it, you're a prostitute.
Baby Bathwater
2003-08-25 04:23:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by manny v
Redfag,
Does your moronic name make reference to your political tendencies?
Only when properly spelled.
Post by manny v
As far as I can tell from yoor writings, you are an ignorant, semi-illiterate
redneck originating from a poor hardscrabble sharecroppers half-acre from a
region where first cousins frequently marry.
Is a semi-illiterate better or worse off than a semi-literate?
I've often wondered what it must be like to marry one's own first
cousin. If it's not too much trouble, please ask your parents.
Post by manny v
Does your family tree fork or does your family prefer to keep the
bloodlines pure?
My ancestors, from my father's side, came to Puerto Rico from
Galicia, the Canary Islands and Andalucia. They came over
in the late to mid 18th century. On my mother's side, they came
also from Galicia and Estremadura and Leon. On her side, the
family tree planted in Puerto Rico dates back to the Conquest.
My maternal great-grandmother's name was
Candida Villafañe Ponce de Leon. Go figure.
manny v
2003-08-25 09:15:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Baby Bathwater
Is a semi-illiterate better or worse off than a semi-literate?
My ancestors, from my father's side, came to Puerto Rico from
Galicia, the Canary Islands and Andalucia. They came over
in the late to mid 18th century. On my mother's side, they came
also from Galicia and Estremadura and Leon. On her side, the
family tree planted in Puerto Rico dates back to the Conquest.
My maternal great-grandmother's name was
Candida Villafañe Ponce de Leon. Go figure.
In your case semi-illiterate is as far as you'll get. Semi-literate would be
an improvement for you.



So you think you've established your European ancestry. But somehow I get
the feeling that what you're trying to do, by elaborating so precisely on
your roots, is hide the fact that you really are embarrassed by your
puertoricanness. But I can't blame you wanting to distance yourself from the
typical Puerto Rican. I've had the displeasure of having to travel to PR on
occasion, and I can't say that too many Puerto Ricans look like Spaniards.



By the way, as far as your views and desires of the US leaving PR, I am
totally in agreement, though definitely not for the same reasons as yours.
For me, the sooner the US government stops blowing the taxpayers hard earned
money on the irrelevant and the ungrateful, the better off we'll all be. The
time is past when this country needs an outpost in the Caribbean, and it
would be interesting to see what would become of your dear little island
when it wakes up one morning and realizes it has to fend for itself and
compete with the rest of the world without it's hand deep in Uncle Sam's
back pocket. Maybe it'll become the next Taiwan...but somehow I doubt it.
The Chinese work.



For the moment, unfortunately, independence seems to be a moot issue, as the
vast majority of Puerto Ricans have voiced their desire to stay on the dole.
Let's all hope that changes.
manny v
2003-08-25 21:47:14 UTC
Permalink
You got something right. You have a lot of intelligent professors which
happen to be imports from Europe, Asia or South America.
You got several good American professors, you are a huge country and a
minority could mean millions of people.
The US is made up of many minorities, there is not one group completely
representative of the entire population, so it stands to reason that our
educational system will be made up of the same proportional mix. If you
really beleive that the majority of the professors in this country are
imported then you're deluding yourself.
In average, your main stream person is half-ass educated.
Then why is the US the richest and arguably the most technologically
advanced country in the world? Oh wait, I forgot, we've imported all the
geniuses.
You have to admit
it, your educational system is not only private, is mostly public and it
sucks.
Make up your mind, is it public or is it private. Your thoughts seem
somewhat confused.
It is so damned bad when an American president goes to other
countries, the host has to speak English because, Bush for example, can't
even speak English right.
If the host speaks English, that language may be used, if he doesn't an
interpreter is brought out.

Bush speaks well enough that I can understand him completely, he may not be
the most articulate and eloquent of presidents, but he gets his points
across just fine. What's the matter, aside from not writing the language
correctly, do you also have a comprehension deficit?
BTW, what is half-illiterate?
Etc........................................................................

I had to clip off the rest of your plunge into deductive logic. Before you
get your panties in a twist and spend more time trying to outsmart me in
this literacy thing, you should recognize that what I wrote was meant as a
humorous insult. Don't make too much of it. If you like I will only refer to
you from now on as semi-literate.
redflag
2003-08-26 10:21:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by manny v
The US is made up of many minorities, there is not one group completely
representative of the entire population, so it stands to reason that our
educational system will be made up of the same proportional mix. If you
really beleive that the majority of the professors in this country are
imported then you're deluding yourself.
You are mistaken. There is one minority in the U.S. and the whole
world, for that matter, who views itself as the final representative
of the entire human race. That minority controls most of the wealth
of the world because it owns the wealth-producing machinery of the
world and most of the resources on the planet. That minority is called
the capitalist class.
--
"Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
with criticism of existing property relations."

"All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
of human nature."

You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
our web page at http://www.slp.org
manny v
2003-08-26 20:05:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by redflag
Post by manny v
The US is made up of many minorities, there is not one group completely
representative of the entire population, so it stands to reason that our
educational system will be made up of the same proportional mix. If you
really beleive that the majority of the professors in this country are
imported then you're deluding yourself.
You are mistaken. There is one minority in the U.S. and the whole
world, for that matter, who views itself as the final representative
of the entire human race. That minority controls most of the wealth
of the world because it owns the wealth-producing machinery of the
world and most of the resources on the planet. That minority is called
the capitalist class.
Holy shit, run for the hills, hide the women and children, the Capitalist
Class is coming!!! Those horrible, terrible, awful, capitalists want to
give us jobs!!!
Cotton Eyed Joe
2003-08-26 22:57:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by redflag
Post by manny v
The US is made up of many minorities, there is not one group completely
representative of the entire population, so it stands to reason that our
educational system will be made up of the same proportional mix. If you
really beleive that the majority of the professors in this country are
imported then you're deluding yourself.
You are mistaken. There is one minority in the U.S. and the whole
world, for that matter, who views itself as the final representative
of the entire human race. That minority controls most of the wealth
of the world because it owns the wealth-producing machinery of the
world and most of the resources on the planet. That minority is called
the capitalist class.
I tend to agree with your assessment of the capitalists. Look what
unbridled capitalism has wrought in Cuba. However, race, nationality,
ethnicity and religion share in the blame for most of the world's
crises.

redflag
2003-08-26 10:15:39 UTC
Permalink
Is the cup half-full or half-empty...
Isn't it the same?
BTW being an American with the worst education in the civilized world, you
are doing pretty good yourself...
Junior-S,
The cup empty/full metaphor doesn't fit my insult to redflag, or whatever
his name is. Semi-illiterate is one who is half illiterate, that person is
not yet at the level of an illiterate person. A semi-literate person would
be one, a bit like yourself, who can partially read and write.
Your attempt to insult me really doesn't stick. I suppose that If i were
really anything like a "semi-illiterate" I wouldn't be able to put two
words together and have them make sense. Moreover, I can read and write
in Spanish and English, some say well.

But if it makes you happy to call me "semi-illiterate" in the belief that
you're offending me, who am I to stand between you and your dreams?
As far as the US having the worst education in the civilized world, I think
you might get an argument or two from graduates of any of a few thousand
universities here. Junior, you have a penchant for hyperbole. Your
argumentation shouldn't stray too far from reality or you might be confused
for a fool.
You really don't have much of an argument do you? I bet anyone mis-
educated in any of the "thousands of universities here" would claim
to possess a superior education. After all, people in the U.S. pay a lot
of money for their diplomas. It's a profitable business.

But not everything that costs a lot of money is worth it. Most
people who suffer the capitalist indoctrination are convinced
that a high price tag is indicative of quality.
--
"Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
with criticism of existing property relations."

"All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
of human nature."

You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
our web page at http://www.slp.org
manny v
2003-08-26 20:10:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by redflag
Your attempt to insult me really doesn't stick. I suppose that If i were
really anything like a "semi-illiterate" I wouldn't be able to put two
words together and have them make sense. Moreover, I can read and write
in Spanish and English, some say well.
You have put more than two words together and you still don't make sense.
Post by redflag
After all, people in the U.S. pay a lot
of money for their diplomas. It's a profitable business.
But not everything that costs a lot of money is worth it. Most
people who suffer the capitalist indoctrination are convinced
that a high price tag is indicative of quality.
Actually, universities are non-profit. But nothing good comes cheap.
Gerardo E. Martínez
2003-08-23 22:45:59 UTC
Permalink
That's right! Police were everywhere! Have you read "1984" by George
Orwell? There was no crime in such a society. Under Hitler, steet crime
was at an all time low in Germany. The same one may say about Russia under
Stalin.

:::Gerardo E.
Post by torresD
"Many families are afraid to send their
daughters to school because people
will kidnap them," said Saad Hashem,
a 38-year-old father of four daughters.
"Under Saddam, it was 100 percent safe.
We could come home at 1 or 2 a.m.;
police were everywhere."
http://www.commondreams.org/headlines03/0819-04.htm
Published on Tuesday, August 4, 2003 by the Boston Globe
Iraqi Women Recoiling in Fear of Crime
by Susan Milligan
BAGHDAD --
Iraqi women, frightened by reports
of a rash of kidnappings and rapes,
are staying indoors, avoiding school,
and donning veils, frustrating those
who hoped that the collapse of
Saddam Hussein's regime would
usher in a new era of freedom and
greater equality for women.
Coalition authorities and local police do not
keep statistics on kidnappings and rapes of
girls and women, crimes a local women's
group says occur 20 times a day across the
country now that the harsh punishments meted
out by Hussein's regime are no longer a threat
to criminals.
Whether the stories are real or exaggerated,
however, Iraqi women say they no longer
shop alone or go out at night --
activities they say they felt
perfectly safe doing under Hussein's rule.
Many families say they are afraid to
send their daughters to school or work,
and some women are reluctantly wearing
veils to avoid tempting gangsters who
prey on young women,
said Hadil Jawad of the Organization
of Women's Freedom in Iraq.
When women came to the office for a
weekly organizing meeting, they covered
their heads, Jawad said.
"I said,
`Why do you cover your head?
You are free.'
They said they had to cover their heads
`so [criminals] would not kidnap us.' "
The rapes have spurred a jump in "honor killings,"
she said, in which a father or husband kills a raped
woman because of the "shame" her victimization
has brought on the family.
Human Rights Watch, in a recent report,
identified 25 credible cases of kidnappings
or rapes of women in the postwar period.
Jawad said the number is much higher,
as many as 20 a day, and Iraqis say they
believe the crime is rampant now that
there is little security.
Both activists and police officers, however,
agree that the crime is likely to be dramatically
underreported, since Muslim Iraqi women may
fear rejection or violence from their families.
A woman
"cannot say anything or come to tell us.
When they grab her, you know what they do with her,"
said Ahmad Assimil, an Iraqi police officer.
"For the Iraqi people, it's shameful, so she keeps silent."
Women endured repression under Hussein's regime,
both as Iraqi citizens in general and as women,
said Hind Wasfi Tahir of the Iraqi Women's League.
A woman could not travel outside
the country without a brother, father,
or husband to escort her,
and attackers could avoid
prosecution for rape by marrying
their victims, Jawad said.
Women are now revealing cases of workplace
sexual harassment during the Hussein era,
she said, and honor killings were largely
overlooked.
Women and girls also were
unable to avoid sexual assault, Tahir said.
"The Ba'ath regime had groups that
kidnapped young girls and young women,
but nobody heard about it," she said.
Female activists had hoped that the new
Iraq would have room for a greater voice
for women in politics and society.
The new Governing Council includes three women.
And while two of the three choose to wear headscarfs,
Jawad said, the inclusion of women on the council marks
a dramatic step forward.
The Iraqi Women's League, in existence since 1952,
is growing bigger and stronger since the fall of Hussein,
Tahir said.
The Organization of Women's Freedom in Iraq
-- closely aligned with groups critical of the postwar
situation in Iraq -- recently expanded from a base in Kurdistan,
and is planning a demonstration next Monday in front of the
Coalition Provisional Authority office, a tactic that would
have been too risky when Hussein was in power.
The fear of rape, however,
is keeping women away from opportunities
they might have in the new Iraq, activists and
Iraqi citizens say.
The stories quickly make the rounds around
Baghdad: the 9-year-old girl who was kidnapped
and raped, and the young woman whose family
paid a ransom to have her released,
but who committed suicide because
she was ashamed of no longer being a virgin.
Jawad told of a young woman who
was in a taxi when three men in a black
car tried to pry her out of the back seat.
The taxi driver managed to speed away,
thwarting the abduction, she said.
"There is no safety in the streets.
If I want to go anywhere, I take my sons with me,"
said Dunia Kamen, 36.
"We hoped for more freedom for women,
but we are disappointed in the situation.
We hope it is temporary."
"We were very happy when the regime collapsed,"
said Karama Abdusallam.
But with the rising danger of rapes and kidnapping,
Abdusallam said her daughter no longer goes to
work because the family cannot handle the burden
of assuring her safety during her commute.
"Under Saddam, we were only afraid of Uday,"
said Abdusallam's daughter, Zeman Arkan,
referring to Hussein's oldest son.
"Now, it's worse than under Saddam.
There's no security for us."
Families are also reluctant to send their
daughters to school when they reopen.
A Save the Children report in May showed
that attendance at girls' schools had dropped
by more than half, largely because parents
didn't want to send their daughters out of the home.
"Many families are afraid to send their
daughters to school because people
will kidnap them," said Saad Hashem,
a 38-year-old father of four daughters.
"Under Saddam, it was 100 percent safe.
We could come home at 1 or 2 a.m.;
police were everywhere."
American soldiers once came to his
daughter's school to protect it when the
girls were taking exams,
but they left soon afterward, Hashem said.
"There is no safety now.
The police don't have any power to protect us," he said.
Women's groups hope to open shelters for
victims afraid to go home to their families,
but they don't have the money to do so.
Colonel Guy Shields, spokesman for the
coalition forces, said he had no information
about reports of rapes and kidnappings.
"The military is not keeping track
of Iraqi criminal statistics," he said.
L. Paul Bremer III, the head of the civilian
Coalition Provisional Authority, said Iraqi
police had broken up two kidnapping rings.
Ahmed Ibrahim, the new deputy interior minister,
said that the kidnappings were a problem but
said police had arrested "a great number"
of the perpetrators.
"We must be able to let women and
children go to the market, the parks," he said.
Salman Abdul Kaleem, a local police colonel,
said he had heard no reports of kidnappings
of women, and said women would feel comfortable
reporting such crimes to the authorities.
"Nothing has happened like that," Kaleem said.
Individuals on Kaleem's police force disagree,
however, saying they have heard of many reports
in their own neighborhoods of women and girls
being nabbed and raped.
"We can do nothing.
I cannot protect them,"
said vice officer Adeal Alwin.
"When I finish my duty here, I don't feel safe going home."
Super Duty
2003-08-24 15:45:33 UTC
Permalink
Rumsfeld Shaking hands in 1983 and Iraq gassing of the Kurds in 1988. "The
facts ma'am, just the facts!"

Count after me 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, , etc, 1983, 1984, 1985, 1986 ,1987, 1988,
etc..

As you can now see, 1983 comes before 1988. What barrio school did you
attend that they didn't teach you how to count correctly?


Get it right lady. You are a discontent in a society that you don't fit in!
Sour grapes..
redflag
2003-08-26 10:25:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Super Duty
Get it right lady. You are a discontent in a society that you don't fit in!
Sour grapes..
Actually, she's a discontent in a disfunctional society. A society in which
violence and greed are presented as virtues.

The criminals that run this criminal system wage war in order to satisfy
their hunger for power and their narrow, individualistic concept of security.
--
"Nowadays, atheism is itself *culpa levis*, as compared
with criticism of existing property relations."

"All history is nothing but a continuous transformation
of human nature."

You can access THE PEOPLE on-line by visiting
our web page at http://www.slp.org
Super Duty
2003-08-26 10:31:37 UTC
Permalink
you have it made in this society otherwise you would have grab the first
canoe out of the country. Right?

"redflag" <***@coqui.net> wrote in message news:***@coqui.net...
Super Duty
2003-08-24 15:46:48 UTC
Permalink
Say it in English, so I'll understand. I understood the History Channel,
that's about all.
Que poco original, copiarse ideas de los programas del History Channel
no se vale.
torresD
2003-08-25 01:24:31 UTC
Permalink
Use the Google Translator, Little Duty.
Post by Super Duty
Say it in English, so I'll understand. I understood the History Channel,
that's about all.
Que poco original, copiarse ideas de los programas del History Channel
no se vale.
Super Duty
2003-08-25 02:13:17 UTC
Permalink
Admit it, you don't know what Super Duty is. You have a little narrow mind.
Post by torresD
Use the Google Translator, Little Duty.
Continúe leyendo en narkive:
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