Discussion:
Saudi man with 58 wives - Hey, Don't Envy
(demasiado antiguo para responder)
torresD
2005-01-02 02:37:19 UTC
Permalink
Some wives even attend his
weddings and bring the bride gifts.

But he said he keeps each wife in
a separate villa and sometimes even
in a different town to keep the peace,
and assures each that she's his favorite.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2005-01-01-saudi-polygamy_x.htm
Saudi man with 58 wives stirs polygamy debate
USFAN, Saudi Arabia (AP) -

In 50 years, he says,
he has married 58 women and has
forgotten the names of most of them.

He knows he has had 10 sons,
but ask about daughters and he
counts on his fingers:

22. No, no, 28.

No, that's too many.

He settles on 25.

'I'm the happiest man in the world,'
says Saleh al-Sayeri.
By Hasan Jamali, AP

Saleh al-Sayeri,
a 64-year-old shepherd-turned-businessman,
says his marital adventures have cost him
more than $1.6 million in wedding expenses
and settlements for divorced wives.

But the man who remembers being forced
into his first marriage at age 14 says
he'd do it a million times over.

"Marriage doesn't bore me,"

he said,

relaxing on cushions at a carpeted,
open-air reception area in his 22-horse
stable in Usfan,

in the desert 500 miles west of Riyadh.

"I'm the happiest man in the world."

Al-Sayeri's story might seem a bizarre curiosity,
but it touches a nerve in Saudi Arabia,
the status of whose women is a matter
of international controversy.

When it surfaced in Saudi media in March,
some readers reacted angrily.

A woman who identified herself as Maryam,
a convert to Islam, wrote to the Arab News,
an English-language daily, that al-Sayeri's
story "really sent me over the edge."

"What kind of a family structure is this?

What is divorce doing to the psychologies
of the ex-wives and children?

How can this man devote any
quality time to his children -
teaching them about Islam and
being a constant role model?"

Al-Sayeri dismisses such critics as "crazy,"
insisting he is not breaching Islamic laws,
which permit a man to have four wives at a time.

"I have a clear conscience," he said.

None of Al-Sayeri's ex-wives could be reached.

He said many have remarried,
but to reveal their identity
would be a gross violation of
Saudi custom.

One of his sons said his
mother has remarried,
but refused to give details.

Divorce has become quite common in the kingdom,
with press reports saying half of all marriages
break up.

But the fate of a divorced woman
depends on her parents' frame of mind.

If they oppose the divorce,
they likely will confine her to
the house and monitor her movements.

She will be barred from dating
or working without family permission.

The notion of a single career
woman barely exists here.

Women cannot even drive.

They cannot get an education,
travel or check into a hotel
without a male guardian's
permission.

Some parents, on the other hand,
are modern-minded enough to let
their daughters finish their
schooling or go out to work.

And although Islamic laws permit a
man to have four wives at a time,
most Muslim men today take one wife,
because it has become the cultural
norm and polygamy is costly.

Money is not an issue for al-Sayeri,
who says he has made a fortune trading
in cars and property.

He is a dark,
medium-built man with black
mustache and goatee who heads
the Sayer, a southern Bedouin tribe.

He also raises camels and horses.

He has had 10 sons, one of whom died.

Two sons who were at the stable
while their father was being
interviewed rolled their eyes
whenever the subject of marriages
came up.

They said they had come to accept
that their dad is "mizwaj,"
a man who likes to marry often.

Fahd al-Sayeri,
who inherited his father's passion for horses,
recalled a desert hunting trip some 15 years
ago in the remote Empty Quarter.

He and his friends had gone in search
of gasoline when they heard celebratory
gunshots coming from a tent.

They had come across a wedding.

"Out of politeness,
we asked who's wedding it was," Fahd said.

"The guests responded with my father's name.

I was shocked," he added.

It's not that the elder
al-Sayeri hides his marriages.

He just doesn't always bother to spread the word.

He said two of his daughters learned they
were sisters and two sons they were brothers
at school.

Some wives even attend his
weddings and bring the bride gifts.

But he said he keeps each wife in
a separate villa and sometimes even
in a different town to keep the peace,
and assures each that she's his favorite.

Son Fahd, a 32-year-old bachelor,
is adamant he won't follow in his
father's footsteps.

"No, no, no," he said.

"One will be enough for me."

Al-Sayeri said he has married first cousins
and women from about 30 tribes all over
the kingdom.

"As a leader of a tribe,
I can't marry just anybody," he said.

He said three of his four current wives
have been with him 18 to 40 years.

The fourth seems to be the
one who usually gets replaced.

"It's the one for renewal,"
said al-Sayeri,

sipping cardamom-flavored coffee
after a dinner of spicy lamb and
rice.

"I like to change my fourth wife every year."

His latest marriage -
and at 10,000 guests his most sumptuous -
was to a 14-year-old girl nine months ago.

She was the perfect age, he said.

When he heard about her,
he sent his niece to check her out.

She came back with a favorable report.

Then he visited her family.

When the girl came into the living
room to offer him refreshments -
an excuse for him to see her face -
he asked her if she would marry him.

"She was shy at first and didn't
answer but then she said yes,"

al-Sayeri recalled.

"Now, we're such good friends
it feels we've known each other
40 years."

A Saudi woman will usually marry
whomever her family chooses,
and marriage is considered
acceptable from the onset of puberty.

Al-Sayeri claims he has never
forced a woman to marry him,
and has never been turned down.

His ex-wives get a divorce settlement
set out in a prenuptial agreement and
he supports the children, he said.

He said all his divorces are documented
with court-issued papers that usually
follow this declaration to his wife:

"You are divorced."

He said today's women are
"more pleasant to have around."

"They take better care of themselves,
use makeup and do not run away every
time I want to touch them," he said.

Al-Sayeri said he will keep on marrying
until the number of wives he has acquired
equals the number of years he has lived.
pedro martori
2005-01-02 03:39:33 UTC
Permalink
58 wives or 58 doggies ?

porque estos sres. son tan misoginos que tratan a sus mujeres como perras...
mas vale un caballo o un perro que una mujer para estos degenerados homosexuales...

olvidan que salieron del vientre de una mujer...asi son esos que uds. tanto admiran...sobre todo si son terroristas y asesinos que matan a gringos...right ?
Post by torresD
Some wives even attend his
weddings and bring the bride gifts.
But he said he keeps each wife in
a separate villa and sometimes even
in a different town to keep the peace,
and assures each that she's his favorite.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2005-01-01-saudi-polygamy_x.htm
Saudi man with 58 wives stirs polygamy debate
USFAN, Saudi Arabia (AP) -
In 50 years, he says,
he has married 58 women and has
forgotten the names of most of them.
He knows he has had 10 sons,
but ask about daughters and he
22. No, no, 28.
No, that's too many.
He settles on 25.
'I'm the happiest man in the world,'
says Saleh al-Sayeri.
By Hasan Jamali, AP
Saleh al-Sayeri,
a 64-year-old shepherd-turned-businessman,
says his marital adventures have cost him
more than $1.6 million in wedding expenses
and settlements for divorced wives.
But the man who remembers being forced
into his first marriage at age 14 says
he'd do it a million times over.
"Marriage doesn't bore me,"
he said,
relaxing on cushions at a carpeted,
open-air reception area in his 22-horse
stable in Usfan,
in the desert 500 miles west of Riyadh.
"I'm the happiest man in the world."
Al-Sayeri's story might seem a bizarre curiosity,
but it touches a nerve in Saudi Arabia,
the status of whose women is a matter
of international controversy.
When it surfaced in Saudi media in March,
some readers reacted angrily.
A woman who identified herself as Maryam,
a convert to Islam, wrote to the Arab News,
an English-language daily, that al-Sayeri's
story "really sent me over the edge."
"What kind of a family structure is this?
What is divorce doing to the psychologies
of the ex-wives and children?
How can this man devote any
quality time to his children -
teaching them about Islam and
being a constant role model?"
Al-Sayeri dismisses such critics as "crazy,"
insisting he is not breaching Islamic laws,
which permit a man to have four wives at a time.
"I have a clear conscience," he said.
None of Al-Sayeri's ex-wives could be reached.
He said many have remarried,
but to reveal their identity
would be a gross violation of
Saudi custom.
One of his sons said his
mother has remarried,
but refused to give details.
Divorce has become quite common in the kingdom,
with press reports saying half of all marriages
break up.
But the fate of a divorced woman
depends on her parents' frame of mind.
If they oppose the divorce,
they likely will confine her to
the house and monitor her movements.
She will be barred from dating
or working without family permission.
The notion of a single career
woman barely exists here.
Women cannot even drive.
They cannot get an education,
travel or check into a hotel
without a male guardian's
permission.
Some parents, on the other hand,
are modern-minded enough to let
their daughters finish their
schooling or go out to work.
And although Islamic laws permit a
man to have four wives at a time,
most Muslim men today take one wife,
because it has become the cultural
norm and polygamy is costly.
Money is not an issue for al-Sayeri,
who says he has made a fortune trading
in cars and property.
He is a dark,
medium-built man with black
mustache and goatee who heads
the Sayer, a southern Bedouin tribe.
He also raises camels and horses.
He has had 10 sons, one of whom died.
Two sons who were at the stable
while their father was being
interviewed rolled their eyes
whenever the subject of marriages
came up.
They said they had come to accept
that their dad is "mizwaj,"
a man who likes to marry often.
Fahd al-Sayeri,
who inherited his father's passion for horses,
recalled a desert hunting trip some 15 years
ago in the remote Empty Quarter.
He and his friends had gone in search
of gasoline when they heard celebratory
gunshots coming from a tent.
They had come across a wedding.
"Out of politeness,
we asked who's wedding it was," Fahd said.
"The guests responded with my father's name.
I was shocked," he added.
It's not that the elder
al-Sayeri hides his marriages.
He just doesn't always bother to spread the word.
He said two of his daughters learned they
were sisters and two sons they were brothers
at school.
Some wives even attend his
weddings and bring the bride gifts.
But he said he keeps each wife in
a separate villa and sometimes even
in a different town to keep the peace,
and assures each that she's his favorite.
Son Fahd, a 32-year-old bachelor,
is adamant he won't follow in his
father's footsteps.
"No, no, no," he said.
"One will be enough for me."
Al-Sayeri said he has married first cousins
and women from about 30 tribes all over
the kingdom.
"As a leader of a tribe,
I can't marry just anybody," he said.
He said three of his four current wives
have been with him 18 to 40 years.
The fourth seems to be the
one who usually gets replaced.
"It's the one for renewal,"
said al-Sayeri,
sipping cardamom-flavored coffee
after a dinner of spicy lamb and
rice.
"I like to change my fourth wife every year."
His latest marriage -
and at 10,000 guests his most sumptuous -
was to a 14-year-old girl nine months ago.
She was the perfect age, he said.
When he heard about her,
he sent his niece to check her out.
She came back with a favorable report.
Then he visited her family.
When the girl came into the living
room to offer him refreshments -
an excuse for him to see her face -
he asked her if she would marry him.
"She was shy at first and didn't
answer but then she said yes,"
al-Sayeri recalled.
"Now, we're such good friends
it feels we've known each other
40 years."
A Saudi woman will usually marry
whomever her family chooses,
and marriage is considered
acceptable from the onset of puberty.
Al-Sayeri claims he has never
forced a woman to marry him,
and has never been turned down.
His ex-wives get a divorce settlement
set out in a prenuptial agreement and
he supports the children, he said.
He said all his divorces are documented
with court-issued papers that usually
"You are divorced."
He said today's women are
"more pleasant to have around."
"They take better care of themselves,
use makeup and do not run away every
time I want to touch them," he said.
Al-Sayeri said he will keep on marrying
until the number of wives he has acquired
equals the number of years he has lived.
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
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pedro martori
2005-01-02 03:49:44 UTC
Permalink
The truth about the Muslim faith
Post by torresD
A True Revelation which will never be widely
publicized....by Rick
Post by torresD
Mathes
Last month I attended my annual training session that's
required for
Post by torresD
maintaining my state prison security clearance. During
the training
Post by torresD
session there was a presentation by three speakers
representing the
Post by torresD
Roman Catholic, Protestant and Muslim faiths, who
explained each of
Post by torresD
their belief systems.
I was particularly interested in what the Islamic Imam
had to say.
Post by torresD
The Imam gave a great presentation of the basics of
Islam, complete
Post by torresD
with a video After the presentations, time was provided
for
questions
Post by torresD
and answers.
When it was my turn, I directed my question to the Imam
"Please, correct me if I'm wrong, but I understand
that most Imams
and
Post by torresD
clerics of Islam have declared a holy jihad [Holy war]
against the
Post by torresD
infidels of the world. And, that by killing an infidel,
which is a
Post by torresD
command to all Muslims, they are assured of a place in
heaven. If
Post by torresD
that's the case, can you give me the definition of an
infidel?"
Post by torresD
There was no disagreement with my statements and,
without
hesitation,
Post by torresD
he replied, "Non-believers!"
I responded, "So, let me make sure I have this
straight. All
followers
Post by torresD
of Allah have been commanded to kill everyone who is not
of your
faith
Post by torresD
so they can go to Heaven. Is that correct?"
The expression on his face changed from one of authority
and command
Post by torresD
to that of a little boy who had just gotten caught with
his hand in
Post by torresD
the cookie jar. He sheepishly replied, "Yes."
I then stated, "Well, sir, I have a real problem
trying to imagine
Post by torresD
Pope John Paul commanding all Catholics to kill those of
your faith
or
Post by torresD
Dr. Stanley ordering Protestants to do the same in order
to go to
Post by torresD
Heaven!"
The Imam was speechless.
I continued, "I also have problem with being your
friend when you
and
Post by torresD
your brother clerics are telling your followers to kill
me. Let me
ask
Post by torresD
you a question. Would you rather have your Allah who
tells you to
kill
Post by torresD
me in order to go to Heaven or my Jesus who tells me to
love you
Post by torresD
because I am going to Heaven and He wants you to be with
me?"
Post by torresD
You could have heard a pin drop as the Imam hung his head
in shame.
Post by torresD
This is a true story and the author, Rick Mathes, is a
well known
Post by torresD
leader in prison ministry. Needless to say, the
organizers and/or
Post by torresD
promoters of the 'Diversification' training seminar were
not happy
Post by torresD
with Rick's way of dealing with the Islamic Imam and
exposing the
Post by torresD
truth about the Muslim's beliefs.
I think everyone in the US should be required to read
this, but with
Post by torresD
the liberal justice system, liberal media, and the
ACLU, there is no way this will be widely publicized.
Please pass
this
Post by torresD
on to all your email contacts.
Have a wonderful day!!!
:-)

________________________________________________________________
Juno Gift Certificates
Give the gift of Internet access this holiday season.
http://www.juno.com/give

58 wives or 58 doggies ?

porque estos sres. son tan misoginos que tratan a sus mujeres como perras...
mas vale un caballo o un perro que una mujer para estos degenerados homosexuales...

olvidan que salieron del vientre de una mujer...asi son esos que uds. tanto admiran...sobre todo si son terroristas y asesinos que matan a gringos...right ?
Post by torresD
Some wives even attend his
weddings and bring the bride gifts.
But he said he keeps each wife in
a separate villa and sometimes even
in a different town to keep the peace,
and assures each that she's his favorite.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2005-01-01-saudi-polygamy_x.htm
Saudi man with 58 wives stirs polygamy debate
USFAN, Saudi Arabia (AP) -
In 50 years, he says,
he has married 58 women and has
forgotten the names of most of them.
He knows he has had 10 sons,
but ask about daughters and he
22. No, no, 28.
No, that's too many.
He settles on 25.
'I'm the happiest man in the world,'
says Saleh al-Sayeri.
By Hasan Jamali, AP
Saleh al-Sayeri,
a 64-year-old shepherd-turned-businessman,
says his marital adventures have cost him
more than $1.6 million in wedding expenses
and settlements for divorced wives.
But the man who remembers being forced
into his first marriage at age 14 says
he'd do it a million times over.
"Marriage doesn't bore me,"
he said,
relaxing on cushions at a carpeted,
open-air reception area in his 22-horse
stable in Usfan,
in the desert 500 miles west of Riyadh.
"I'm the happiest man in the world."
Al-Sayeri's story might seem a bizarre curiosity,
but it touches a nerve in Saudi Arabia,
the status of whose women is a matter
of international controversy.
When it surfaced in Saudi media in March,
some readers reacted angrily.
A woman who identified herself as Maryam,
a convert to Islam, wrote to the Arab News,
an English-language daily, that al-Sayeri's
story "really sent me over the edge."
"What kind of a family structure is this?
What is divorce doing to the psychologies
of the ex-wives and children?
How can this man devote any
quality time to his children -
teaching them about Islam and
being a constant role model?"
Al-Sayeri dismisses such critics as "crazy,"
insisting he is not breaching Islamic laws,
which permit a man to have four wives at a time.
"I have a clear conscience," he said.
None of Al-Sayeri's ex-wives could be reached.
He said many have remarried,
but to reveal their identity
would be a gross violation of
Saudi custom.
One of his sons said his
mother has remarried,
but refused to give details.
Divorce has become quite common in the kingdom,
with press reports saying half of all marriages
break up.
But the fate of a divorced woman
depends on her parents' frame of mind.
If they oppose the divorce,
they likely will confine her to
the house and monitor her movements.
She will be barred from dating
or working without family permission.
The notion of a single career
woman barely exists here.
Women cannot even drive.
They cannot get an education,
travel or check into a hotel
without a male guardian's
permission.
Some parents, on the other hand,
are modern-minded enough to let
their daughters finish their
schooling or go out to work.
And although Islamic laws permit a
man to have four wives at a time,
most Muslim men today take one wife,
because it has become the cultural
norm and polygamy is costly.
Money is not an issue for al-Sayeri,
who says he has made a fortune trading
in cars and property.
He is a dark,
medium-built man with black
mustache and goatee who heads
the Sayer, a southern Bedouin tribe.
He also raises camels and horses.
He has had 10 sons, one of whom died.
Two sons who were at the stable
while their father was being
interviewed rolled their eyes
whenever the subject of marriages
came up.
They said they had come to accept
that their dad is "mizwaj,"
a man who likes to marry often.
Fahd al-Sayeri,
who inherited his father's passion for horses,
recalled a desert hunting trip some 15 years
ago in the remote Empty Quarter.
He and his friends had gone in search
of gasoline when they heard celebratory
gunshots coming from a tent.
They had come across a wedding.
"Out of politeness,
we asked who's wedding it was," Fahd said.
"The guests responded with my father's name.
I was shocked," he added.
It's not that the elder
al-Sayeri hides his marriages.
He just doesn't always bother to spread the word.
He said two of his daughters learned they
were sisters and two sons they were brothers
at school.
Some wives even attend his
weddings and bring the bride gifts.
But he said he keeps each wife in
a separate villa and sometimes even
in a different town to keep the peace,
and assures each that she's his favorite.
Son Fahd, a 32-year-old bachelor,
is adamant he won't follow in his
father's footsteps.
"No, no, no," he said.
"One will be enough for me."
Al-Sayeri said he has married first cousins
and women from about 30 tribes all over
the kingdom.
"As a leader of a tribe,
I can't marry just anybody," he said.
He said three of his four current wives
have been with him 18 to 40 years.
The fourth seems to be the
one who usually gets replaced.
"It's the one for renewal,"
said al-Sayeri,
sipping cardamom-flavored coffee
after a dinner of spicy lamb and
rice.
"I like to change my fourth wife every year."
His latest marriage -
and at 10,000 guests his most sumptuous -
was to a 14-year-old girl nine months ago.
She was the perfect age, he said.
When he heard about her,
he sent his niece to check her out.
She came back with a favorable report.
Then he visited her family.
When the girl came into the living
room to offer him refreshments -
an excuse for him to see her face -
he asked her if she would marry him.
"She was shy at first and didn't
answer but then she said yes,"
al-Sayeri recalled.
"Now, we're such good friends
it feels we've known each other
40 years."
A Saudi woman will usually marry
whomever her family chooses,
and marriage is considered
acceptable from the onset of puberty.
Al-Sayeri claims he has never
forced a woman to marry him,
and has never been turned down.
His ex-wives get a divorce settlement
set out in a prenuptial agreement and
he supports the children, he said.
He said all his divorces are documented
with court-issued papers that usually
"You are divorced."
He said today's women are
"more pleasant to have around."
"They take better care of themselves,
use makeup and do not run away every
time I want to touch them," he said.
Al-Sayeri said he will keep on marrying
until the number of wives he has acquired
equals the number of years he has lived.
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.823 / Virus Database: 561 - Release Date: 12/26/2004
torresD
2005-01-02 03:53:19 UTC
Permalink
Mira, tu no puedes ni con una, y este a tenido 58
y si leas, recien se caso, con una de l4 años de edad.

Te mueres de la envidia.

Y las queridas de los Cubanos, cuenta me,
te olivdaste de eso, Martori.

Tu ni con Viagra, viejo verdad.


"pedro martori" <***@progression.net> wrote in message news:KoOdnRB2441q8UrcRVn-***@look.ca...
58 wives or 58 doggies ?

porque estos sres. son tan misoginos que tratan a sus mujeres como
perras...
mas vale un caballo o un perro que una mujer para estos degenerados
homosexuales...

olvidan que salieron del vientre de una mujer...asi son esos que uds. tanto
admiran...sobre todo si son terroristas y asesinos que matan a
gringos...right ?
Post by torresD
Some wives even attend his
weddings and bring the bride gifts.
But he said he keeps each wife in
a separate villa and sometimes even
in a different town to keep the peace,
and assures each that she's his favorite.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2005-01-01-saudi-polygamy_x.htm
Saudi man with 58 wives stirs polygamy debate
USFAN, Saudi Arabia (AP) -
In 50 years, he says,
he has married 58 women and has
forgotten the names of most of them.
He knows he has had 10 sons,
but ask about daughters and he
22. No, no, 28.
No, that's too many.
He settles on 25.
'I'm the happiest man in the world,'
says Saleh al-Sayeri.
By Hasan Jamali, AP
Saleh al-Sayeri,
a 64-year-old shepherd-turned-businessman,
says his marital adventures have cost him
more than $1.6 million in wedding expenses
and settlements for divorced wives.
But the man who remembers being forced
into his first marriage at age 14 says
he'd do it a million times over.
"Marriage doesn't bore me,"
he said,
relaxing on cushions at a carpeted,
open-air reception area in his 22-horse
stable in Usfan,
in the desert 500 miles west of Riyadh.
"I'm the happiest man in the world."
Al-Sayeri's story might seem a bizarre curiosity,
but it touches a nerve in Saudi Arabia,
the status of whose women is a matter
of international controversy.
When it surfaced in Saudi media in March,
some readers reacted angrily.
A woman who identified herself as Maryam,
a convert to Islam, wrote to the Arab News,
an English-language daily, that al-Sayeri's
story "really sent me over the edge."
"What kind of a family structure is this?
What is divorce doing to the psychologies
of the ex-wives and children?
How can this man devote any
quality time to his children -
teaching them about Islam and
being a constant role model?"
Al-Sayeri dismisses such critics as "crazy,"
insisting he is not breaching Islamic laws,
which permit a man to have four wives at a time.
"I have a clear conscience," he said.
None of Al-Sayeri's ex-wives could be reached.
He said many have remarried,
but to reveal their identity
would be a gross violation of
Saudi custom.
One of his sons said his
mother has remarried,
but refused to give details.
Divorce has become quite common in the kingdom,
with press reports saying half of all marriages
break up.
But the fate of a divorced woman
depends on her parents' frame of mind.
If they oppose the divorce,
they likely will confine her to
the house and monitor her movements.
She will be barred from dating
or working without family permission.
The notion of a single career
woman barely exists here.
Women cannot even drive.
They cannot get an education,
travel or check into a hotel
without a male guardian's
permission.
Some parents, on the other hand,
are modern-minded enough to let
their daughters finish their
schooling or go out to work.
And although Islamic laws permit a
man to have four wives at a time,
most Muslim men today take one wife,
because it has become the cultural
norm and polygamy is costly.
Money is not an issue for al-Sayeri,
who says he has made a fortune trading
in cars and property.
He is a dark,
medium-built man with black
mustache and goatee who heads
the Sayer, a southern Bedouin tribe.
He also raises camels and horses.
He has had 10 sons, one of whom died.
Two sons who were at the stable
while their father was being
interviewed rolled their eyes
whenever the subject of marriages
came up.
They said they had come to accept
that their dad is "mizwaj,"
a man who likes to marry often.
Fahd al-Sayeri,
who inherited his father's passion for horses,
recalled a desert hunting trip some 15 years
ago in the remote Empty Quarter.
He and his friends had gone in search
of gasoline when they heard celebratory
gunshots coming from a tent.
They had come across a wedding.
"Out of politeness,
we asked who's wedding it was," Fahd said.
"The guests responded with my father's name.
I was shocked," he added.
It's not that the elder
al-Sayeri hides his marriages.
He just doesn't always bother to spread the word.
He said two of his daughters learned they
were sisters and two sons they were brothers
at school.
Some wives even attend his
weddings and bring the bride gifts.
But he said he keeps each wife in
a separate villa and sometimes even
in a different town to keep the peace,
and assures each that she's his favorite.
Son Fahd, a 32-year-old bachelor,
is adamant he won't follow in his
father's footsteps.
"No, no, no," he said.
"One will be enough for me."
Al-Sayeri said he has married first cousins
and women from about 30 tribes all over
the kingdom.
"As a leader of a tribe,
I can't marry just anybody," he said.
He said three of his four current wives
have been with him 18 to 40 years.
The fourth seems to be the
one who usually gets replaced.
"It's the one for renewal,"
said al-Sayeri,
sipping cardamom-flavored coffee
after a dinner of spicy lamb and
rice.
"I like to change my fourth wife every year."
His latest marriage -
and at 10,000 guests his most sumptuous -
was to a 14-year-old girl nine months ago.
She was the perfect age, he said.
When he heard about her,
he sent his niece to check her out.
She came back with a favorable report.
Then he visited her family.
When the girl came into the living
room to offer him refreshments -
an excuse for him to see her face -
he asked her if she would marry him.
"She was shy at first and didn't
answer but then she said yes,"
al-Sayeri recalled.
"Now, we're such good friends
it feels we've known each other
40 years."
A Saudi woman will usually marry
whomever her family chooses,
and marriage is considered
acceptable from the onset of puberty.
Al-Sayeri claims he has never
forced a woman to marry him,
and has never been turned down.
His ex-wives get a divorce settlement
set out in a prenuptial agreement and
he supports the children, he said.
He said all his divorces are documented
with court-issued papers that usually
"You are divorced."
He said today's women are
"more pleasant to have around."
"They take better care of themselves,
use makeup and do not run away every
time I want to touch them," he said.
Al-Sayeri said he will keep on marrying
until the number of wives he has acquired
equals the number of years he has lived.
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.823 / Virus Database: 561 - Release Date: 12/26/2004
pedro martori
2005-01-02 04:03:31 UTC
Permalink
JA,JA, JA DOROTEA...si tu fueras una de las candidatas a Miss Universo, TE PUDIERA DECIR ALGO ...PERO COMO SE QUE ERES UN CASCO SOLAMENTE Y LLENO DE MALAS IDEAS...PUES NO TE PUEDO DESAFIAR A QUE PRUEBES...

por lo demas...yo no puedo quejarme ,ni mucho menos envidiar a esos sarnosos y kagalitrosos...mi cuenta de las que he tenido a lo largo de mi vida...ya hace rato que la perdi...JA,JA, JA...!

Ah ! y la mayoria las escogia yo y nunca me trance por ninguna que no estuviera a la altura de mi gusto...siempre respetuoso , gentleman y sin recurrir a ningun artificio o cuento de camino...o pagar por un ratico...como hacen un monton de pobre diablos por ahi...
Post by torresD
Mira, tu no puedes ni con una, y este a tenido 58
y si leas, recien se caso, con una de l4 años de edad.
Te mueres de la envidia.
Y las queridas de los Cubanos, cuenta me,
te olivdaste de eso, Martori.
Tu ni con Viagra, viejo verdad.
58 wives or 58 doggies ?
porque estos sres. son tan misoginos que tratan a sus mujeres como perras...
mas vale un caballo o un perro que una mujer para estos degenerados homosexuales...
olvidan que salieron del vientre de una mujer...asi son esos que uds. tanto
admiran...sobre todo si son terroristas y asesinos que matan a
gringos...right ?
Post by torresD
Some wives even attend his
weddings and bring the bride gifts.
But he said he keeps each wife in
a separate villa and sometimes even
in a different town to keep the peace,
and assures each that she's his favorite.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2005-01-01-saudi-polygamy_x.htm
Saudi man with 58 wives stirs polygamy debate
USFAN, Saudi Arabia (AP) -
In 50 years, he says,
he has married 58 women and has
forgotten the names of most of them.
He knows he has had 10 sons,
but ask about daughters and he
22. No, no, 28.
No, that's too many.
He settles on 25.
'I'm the happiest man in the world,'
says Saleh al-Sayeri.
By Hasan Jamali, AP
Saleh al-Sayeri,
a 64-year-old shepherd-turned-businessman,
says his marital adventures have cost him
more than $1.6 million in wedding expenses
and settlements for divorced wives.
But the man who remembers being forced
into his first marriage at age 14 says
he'd do it a million times over.
"Marriage doesn't bore me,"
he said,
relaxing on cushions at a carpeted,
open-air reception area in his 22-horse
stable in Usfan,
in the desert 500 miles west of Riyadh.
"I'm the happiest man in the world."
Al-Sayeri's story might seem a bizarre curiosity,
but it touches a nerve in Saudi Arabia,
the status of whose women is a matter
of international controversy.
When it surfaced in Saudi media in March,
some readers reacted angrily.
A woman who identified herself as Maryam,
a convert to Islam, wrote to the Arab News,
an English-language daily, that al-Sayeri's
story "really sent me over the edge."
"What kind of a family structure is this?
What is divorce doing to the psychologies
of the ex-wives and children?
How can this man devote any
quality time to his children -
teaching them about Islam and
being a constant role model?"
Al-Sayeri dismisses such critics as "crazy,"
insisting he is not breaching Islamic laws,
which permit a man to have four wives at a time.
"I have a clear conscience," he said.
None of Al-Sayeri's ex-wives could be reached.
He said many have remarried,
but to reveal their identity
would be a gross violation of
Saudi custom.
One of his sons said his
mother has remarried,
but refused to give details.
Divorce has become quite common in the kingdom,
with press reports saying half of all marriages
break up.
But the fate of a divorced woman
depends on her parents' frame of mind.
If they oppose the divorce,
they likely will confine her to
the house and monitor her movements.
She will be barred from dating
or working without family permission.
The notion of a single career
woman barely exists here.
Women cannot even drive.
They cannot get an education,
travel or check into a hotel
without a male guardian's
permission.
Some parents, on the other hand,
are modern-minded enough to let
their daughters finish their
schooling or go out to work.
And although Islamic laws permit a
man to have four wives at a time,
most Muslim men today take one wife,
because it has become the cultural
norm and polygamy is costly.
Money is not an issue for al-Sayeri,
who says he has made a fortune trading
in cars and property.
He is a dark,
medium-built man with black
mustache and goatee who heads
the Sayer, a southern Bedouin tribe.
He also raises camels and horses.
He has had 10 sons, one of whom died.
Two sons who were at the stable
while their father was being
interviewed rolled their eyes
whenever the subject of marriages
came up.
They said they had come to accept
that their dad is "mizwaj,"
a man who likes to marry often.
Fahd al-Sayeri,
who inherited his father's passion for horses,
recalled a desert hunting trip some 15 years
ago in the remote Empty Quarter.
He and his friends had gone in search
of gasoline when they heard celebratory
gunshots coming from a tent.
They had come across a wedding.
"Out of politeness,
we asked who's wedding it was," Fahd said.
"The guests responded with my father's name.
I was shocked," he added.
It's not that the elder
al-Sayeri hides his marriages.
He just doesn't always bother to spread the word.
He said two of his daughters learned they
were sisters and two sons they were brothers
at school.
Some wives even attend his
weddings and bring the bride gifts.
But he said he keeps each wife in
a separate villa and sometimes even
in a different town to keep the peace,
and assures each that she's his favorite.
Son Fahd, a 32-year-old bachelor,
is adamant he won't follow in his
father's footsteps.
"No, no, no," he said.
"One will be enough for me."
Al-Sayeri said he has married first cousins
and women from about 30 tribes all over
the kingdom.
"As a leader of a tribe,
I can't marry just anybody," he said.
He said three of his four current wives
have been with him 18 to 40 years.
The fourth seems to be the
one who usually gets replaced.
"It's the one for renewal,"
said al-Sayeri,
sipping cardamom-flavored coffee
after a dinner of spicy lamb and
rice.
"I like to change my fourth wife every year."
His latest marriage -
and at 10,000 guests his most sumptuous -
was to a 14-year-old girl nine months ago.
She was the perfect age, he said.
When he heard about her,
he sent his niece to check her out.
She came back with a favorable report.
Then he visited her family.
When the girl came into the living
room to offer him refreshments -
an excuse for him to see her face -
he asked her if she would marry him.
"She was shy at first and didn't
answer but then she said yes,"
al-Sayeri recalled.
"Now, we're such good friends
it feels we've known each other
40 years."
A Saudi woman will usually marry
whomever her family chooses,
and marriage is considered
acceptable from the onset of puberty.
Al-Sayeri claims he has never
forced a woman to marry him,
and has never been turned down.
His ex-wives get a divorce settlement
set out in a prenuptial agreement and
he supports the children, he said.
He said all his divorces are documented
with court-issued papers that usually
"You are divorced."
He said today's women are
"more pleasant to have around."
"They take better care of themselves,
use makeup and do not run away every
time I want to touch them," he said.
Al-Sayeri said he will keep on marrying
until the number of wives he has acquired
equals the number of years he has lived.
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.823 / Virus Database: 561 - Release Date: 12/26/2004
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.823 / Virus Database: 561 - Release Date: 12/26/2004
torresD
2005-01-02 04:12:47 UTC
Permalink
Sonar no cuesta nada, Martori.


"pedro martori" <***@progression.net> wrote in message news:Nf6dnektaI4I70rcRVn-***@look.ca...
JA,JA, JA DOROTEA...si tu fueras una de las candidatas a Miss Universo, TE
PUDIERA DECIR ALGO ...PERO COMO SE QUE ERES UN CASCO SOLAMENTE Y LLENO DE
MALAS IDEAS...PUES NO TE PUEDO DESAFIAR A QUE PRUEBES...

por lo demas...yo no puedo quejarme ,ni mucho menos envidiar a esos sarnosos
y kagalitrosos...mi cuenta de las que he tenido a lo largo de mi vida...ya
hace rato que la perdi...JA,JA, JA...!

Ah ! y la mayoria las escogia yo y nunca me trance por ninguna que no
estuviera a la altura de mi gusto...siempre respetuoso , gentleman y sin
recurrir a ningun artificio o cuento de camino...o pagar por un
ratico...como hacen un monton de pobre diablos por ahi...
Post by torresD
Mira, tu no puedes ni con una, y este a tenido 58
y si leas, recien se caso, con una de l4 años de edad.
Te mueres de la envidia.
Y las queridas de los Cubanos, cuenta me,
te olivdaste de eso, Martori.
Tu ni con Viagra, viejo verdad.
58 wives or 58 doggies ?
porque estos sres. son tan misoginos que tratan a sus mujeres como perras...
mas vale un caballo o un perro que una mujer para estos degenerados homosexuales...
olvidan que salieron del vientre de una mujer...asi son esos que uds. tanto
admiran...sobre todo si son terroristas y asesinos que matan a
gringos...right ?
Post by torresD
Some wives even attend his
weddings and bring the bride gifts.
But he said he keeps each wife in
a separate villa and sometimes even
in a different town to keep the peace,
and assures each that she's his favorite.
http://www.usatoday.com/news/world/2005-01-01-saudi-polygamy_x.htm
Saudi man with 58 wives stirs polygamy debate
USFAN, Saudi Arabia (AP) -
In 50 years, he says,
he has married 58 women and has
forgotten the names of most of them.
He knows he has had 10 sons,
but ask about daughters and he
22. No, no, 28.
No, that's too many.
He settles on 25.
'I'm the happiest man in the world,'
says Saleh al-Sayeri.
By Hasan Jamali, AP
Saleh al-Sayeri,
a 64-year-old shepherd-turned-businessman,
says his marital adventures have cost him
more than $1.6 million in wedding expenses
and settlements for divorced wives.
But the man who remembers being forced
into his first marriage at age 14 says
he'd do it a million times over.
"Marriage doesn't bore me,"
he said,
relaxing on cushions at a carpeted,
open-air reception area in his 22-horse
stable in Usfan,
in the desert 500 miles west of Riyadh.
"I'm the happiest man in the world."
Al-Sayeri's story might seem a bizarre curiosity,
but it touches a nerve in Saudi Arabia,
the status of whose women is a matter
of international controversy.
When it surfaced in Saudi media in March,
some readers reacted angrily.
A woman who identified herself as Maryam,
a convert to Islam, wrote to the Arab News,
an English-language daily, that al-Sayeri's
story "really sent me over the edge."
"What kind of a family structure is this?
What is divorce doing to the psychologies
of the ex-wives and children?
How can this man devote any
quality time to his children -
teaching them about Islam and
being a constant role model?"
Al-Sayeri dismisses such critics as "crazy,"
insisting he is not breaching Islamic laws,
which permit a man to have four wives at a time.
"I have a clear conscience," he said.
None of Al-Sayeri's ex-wives could be reached.
He said many have remarried,
but to reveal their identity
would be a gross violation of
Saudi custom.
One of his sons said his
mother has remarried,
but refused to give details.
Divorce has become quite common in the kingdom,
with press reports saying half of all marriages
break up.
But the fate of a divorced woman
depends on her parents' frame of mind.
If they oppose the divorce,
they likely will confine her to
the house and monitor her movements.
She will be barred from dating
or working without family permission.
The notion of a single career
woman barely exists here.
Women cannot even drive.
They cannot get an education,
travel or check into a hotel
without a male guardian's
permission.
Some parents, on the other hand,
are modern-minded enough to let
their daughters finish their
schooling or go out to work.
And although Islamic laws permit a
man to have four wives at a time,
most Muslim men today take one wife,
because it has become the cultural
norm and polygamy is costly.
Money is not an issue for al-Sayeri,
who says he has made a fortune trading
in cars and property.
He is a dark,
medium-built man with black
mustache and goatee who heads
the Sayer, a southern Bedouin tribe.
He also raises camels and horses.
He has had 10 sons, one of whom died.
Two sons who were at the stable
while their father was being
interviewed rolled their eyes
whenever the subject of marriages
came up.
They said they had come to accept
that their dad is "mizwaj,"
a man who likes to marry often.
Fahd al-Sayeri,
who inherited his father's passion for horses,
recalled a desert hunting trip some 15 years
ago in the remote Empty Quarter.
He and his friends had gone in search
of gasoline when they heard celebratory
gunshots coming from a tent.
They had come across a wedding.
"Out of politeness,
we asked who's wedding it was," Fahd said.
"The guests responded with my father's name.
I was shocked," he added.
It's not that the elder
al-Sayeri hides his marriages.
He just doesn't always bother to spread the word.
He said two of his daughters learned they
were sisters and two sons they were brothers
at school.
Some wives even attend his
weddings and bring the bride gifts.
But he said he keeps each wife in
a separate villa and sometimes even
in a different town to keep the peace,
and assures each that she's his favorite.
Son Fahd, a 32-year-old bachelor,
is adamant he won't follow in his
father's footsteps.
"No, no, no," he said.
"One will be enough for me."
Al-Sayeri said he has married first cousins
and women from about 30 tribes all over
the kingdom.
"As a leader of a tribe,
I can't marry just anybody," he said.
He said three of his four current wives
have been with him 18 to 40 years.
The fourth seems to be the
one who usually gets replaced.
"It's the one for renewal,"
said al-Sayeri,
sipping cardamom-flavored coffee
after a dinner of spicy lamb and
rice.
"I like to change my fourth wife every year."
His latest marriage -
and at 10,000 guests his most sumptuous -
was to a 14-year-old girl nine months ago.
She was the perfect age, he said.
When he heard about her,
he sent his niece to check her out.
She came back with a favorable report.
Then he visited her family.
When the girl came into the living
room to offer him refreshments -
an excuse for him to see her face -
he asked her if she would marry him.
"She was shy at first and didn't
answer but then she said yes,"
al-Sayeri recalled.
"Now, we're such good friends
it feels we've known each other
40 years."
A Saudi woman will usually marry
whomever her family chooses,
and marriage is considered
acceptable from the onset of puberty.
Al-Sayeri claims he has never
forced a woman to marry him,
and has never been turned down.
His ex-wives get a divorce settlement
set out in a prenuptial agreement and
he supports the children, he said.
He said all his divorces are documented
with court-issued papers that usually
"You are divorced."
He said today's women are
"more pleasant to have around."
"They take better care of themselves,
use makeup and do not run away every
time I want to touch them," he said.
Al-Sayeri said he will keep on marrying
until the number of wives he has acquired
equals the number of years he has lived.
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.823 / Virus Database: 561 - Release Date: 12/26/2004
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.823 / Virus Database: 561 - Release Date: 12/26/2004
pedro martori
2005-01-02 04:04:11 UTC
Permalink
December 31, 2004

TOP STORY

Oracle Takes Over PeopleSoft Posts
Four PeopleSoft executives were replaced by officers at Oracle, which is working to complete a $10.3-billion acquisition of its business software rival.
full story below Markets 3:11 p.m. Eastern
DJIA 10822.39 +22.09
Nasdaq 2182.15 +3.81
DJ Internet 76.11 +0.46
MS Hi-Tech 509.00 +0.81
CBOE Tech 614.36 +1.60

Source: Reuters



TODAY'S NEWS
(Wall Street Journal Online
subscription required)

Techs March Toward Strong 2004 Finish
Tech shares are on track for a strong 2004 finish, as end-of-year optimism helped drive stocks forward Friday afternoon. As of Thursday's close, the Nasdaq is up 8.7% for the year. more at WSJ.com

Vimpelcom 2001 Tax Bill Is Significantly Cut
Russia's Vimpelcom said tax inspectors reviewing its 2001 Russian tax filing decided that the mobile-phone operator owes only an additional $10.2 million in taxes and $7.4 million in fines and penalties, lower than a preliminary estimate. more at WSJ.com

Tulip Sells Commodore Brand
A Dutch company said it will sell the once-mighty Commodore computer brand to U.S.-based Yeahronimo Media Ventures for $32.6 million. more at WSJ.com

Advanced Semiconductor Eyes China
Advanced Semiconductor Engineering is worried that it may lose some of its existing business if it doesn't set up testing and packaging operations in China in the near future more at WSJ.com

U.S. Confirms Arrest of Apex Digital Chief
The U.S. Embassy confirmed Apex Digital's chairman was arrested in China, as a second Chinese firm, Genius, revealed the California supplier of TV sets and DVD players owed it money. more at WSJ.com



TOP STORY

Oracle Officers Take Over
Four PeopleSoft Posts

By SHIRA OVIDE
Dow Jones Newswires


WASHINGTON -- Four executives of PeopleSoft Corp. were replaced by officers of Oracle Corp., which is working to complete a $10.3-billion acquisition of its business software rival.

According to a regulatory filing Thursday, the replaced PeopleSoft executives are Co-President and Chief Financial Officer Kevin Parker, Co-President Phillip Wilmington, Chief Marketing Officer Nanci Caldwell and General Counsel James Shaughnessy.

Safra Catz and Charles Phillips were named as co-presidents, Harry You as financial chief and Daniel Cooperman as general counsel, according to the Securities and Exchange Commission filing. They each hold the same posts at Oracle.

The move comes after Oracle said it had taken control of 75% of PeopleSoft's shares and appointed four people to PeopleSoft's board, giving it a majority. PeopleSoft also disclosed this week that its chairman and chief executive, David Duffield, had resigned.

Earlier this month, PeopleSoft agreed to be acquired by Oracle for $26.50 a share, ending an 18-month hostile battle. Oracle expects to complete the acquisition in January.

Write to Shira Ovide at ***@dowjones.com


return to top of page



FEATURES
(Wall Street Journal Online
subscription required)

Mobile Content Is
Set to Take Off
The Year in Technology:
After years of unmet expectations, the market for mobile-content may finally be taking off. Start-ups are facing new competition as large media companies angle for a piece of the action. more at WSJ.com

The Invisible Fighter
MIT Technology Review:
The military is turning to digital-imaging technology to help hide its troops as it deals with tricky urban terrain that renders traditional camouflage useless. more at WSJ.com

Have Cantenna,
Can Surf
Loose Wire,
by Jeremy Wagstaff: The tin-can antenna is an answer to a problem you would think only nerds could come up with: Getting two computers to talk to each other over long distances without any cabling. more at WSJ.com







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Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
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pedro martori
2005-01-02 04:27:02 UTC
Permalink
NOTICIAS EL UNIVERSAL
Caracas, viernes 31 de diciembre, 2004
Nacional y Política
SIP observa avances y retrocesos en 2005
Miami. El año 2004 ha mostrado "grandes avances" y a la vez "impresionantes retrocesos" en materia de libertad de prensa en el hemisferio, sostuvo el presidente de la Sociedad Interamericana de Prensa, Alejandro Miró Quesada.
ver más información



Asesinos de Anderson estarían en Costa Rica
Los presuntos asesinos del fiscal Danilo Anderson están en Costa Rica, indicaron medios de comunicación que citaron como fuente a los fiscales encargados de la investigación del atentado, perpetrado en noviembre pasado.
ver más información



Ex gobernador David de Lima acudió de nuevo a la Fiscalía
Puerto La Cruz. Ayer acudió a la sede del Ministerio Público, por tercera vez en una semana, el ex gobernador de Anzoátegui David De Lima, a fin de conocer los detalles de la imputación que le impondrá la Fiscalía por el presunto delito de peculado doloso propio por el caso de un supuesto desvío de 500 millones de bolívares, correspondientes al programa alimentario escolar 2001.
ver más información



Asamblea Nacional en mora con la Ley Orgánica de Educación
Pese a la importancia que le ha dado el Ejecutivo al tema educativo, que se expresa en las misiones: Robinson, Ribas y Sucre, así como los diversos programas que adelanta el Ministerio de Educación y Deportes (MED) en todos los niveles de la enseñanza pública, la Asamblea Nacional (AN) se muestra indiferente a éste. Así lo demuestra la demora para la aprobación, en segunda discusión, de la Ley Orgánica de Educación (LOE) que el año entrante tendrá cuatro años de haber sido debatida en el Parlamento.
ver más información



Monseñor Freddy Fuenmayor nuevo obispo de Los Teques
El papa Juan Pablo II aceptó la renuncia de monseñor Ramón Ovidio Pérez Morales al cargo de la Diócesis de Los Teques y nombró nuevo obispo a monseñor Freddy Jesús Fuenmayor Suárez.
ver más información



Visita a la India en marzo
Para el 28 de enero está prevista la visita del vicepresidente chino a Venezuela, Zeng Qinghon, para reafirmar los acuerdos que fueron adelantados en el reciente viaje que hizo el presidente de la República, Hugo Chávez, a ese país asiático. Vendrá acompañado de una delegación gubernamental y empresarial.
ver más información



Hacia la apertura universitaria

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Reducen delitos fronterizos con comando élite
La Guardia Nacional reproducirá en otros comandos regionales del país la Unidad Operacional de Orden Interno que funciona en el Zulia, debido al impacto en la reducción de los delitos fronterizos que ha tenido ese cuerpo élite.
ver más información





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pedro martori
2005-01-02 04:25:17 UTC
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NOTICIAS EL UNIVERSAL
Caracas, viernes 31 de diciembre, 2004
Opinión
Eli Bravo // Tiempo de balances (o lo que debe haber y no hay)
DE BALANCE EN GENERAL, y no puede ser de otra manera, si tenemos esta costumbre de pensar en ciclos. Por eso es tentador sopesar el impacto que 2004 tuvo en nuestras vidas. Pescar sucesos y dibujar tendencias; asunto arbitrario que parte de los hechos y se desplaza con la interpretación que hace el ojo del cronista. Quizás nadie haya evaluado un año de forma tan práctica como aquel que cuadró sus cuentas con una chiva, una burra negra, una yegua blanca y una buena suegra. Claro, queda por saber si alimentarlas a todas resultó tan positivo una vez llegado julio.
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Rayma

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Nuestra Tribuna
Se dijo que el año que hoy termina era decisivo. En lo político, lo económico, lo social, en todos los aspectos que orientan una forma de gobierno, una visión filosófica de sociedad, desde el poder. Y, efectivamente, lo fue.
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James Otis Rodner // Reflexiones cambiarias
HA PASADO MAS DE AÑO y medio desde que se adoptó el control de cambio, con su sistema complejo de providencias. Con el precio del petróleo, no es posible pensar que el control de cambio sea necesario para proteger la balanza comercial, la cual tiene un superávit enorme. La única excusa que formalmente se da para mantener el sistema es que con una paridad única y libre, a la tasa actual se produciría una enorme fuga de capital. Pero la razón más importante para mantener el sistema es que éste sirve como una forma de control de la inflación, o sea, como ancla cambiaria.
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Pynchas Brener // Esencia del liderazgo
EN SU LIBRO Eyewitness to Power, David Gergen testimonia sus años en la Casa Blanca de Washington desde la presidencia de Richard Nixon hasta la de Bill Clinton. Concluye que los presidentes, intelectualmente más brillantes, fueron efectivamente los dos mencionados. Clinton fue el táctico y Nixon el gran estratega. No escapa al análisis de Gergen, que tanto Nixon como Clinton, tenían personalidades fallidas, tal como demostraran los casos Watergate y Mónica Lewinsky, respectivamente. En el caso de Nixon, por tratarse de un asunto de Estado, el escándalo culminó en su renuncia. Clinton sobrevivió al vergonzoso episodio y con su carisma único continúa siendo la personalidad política actual más sobresaliente del partido demócrata.
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Gerardo Blyde // ¡Qué bien, Chávez!
"¿VENEZOLANO? ¡Qué bien, Chávez!". Así respondió un buhonero peruano ubicado en una esquina muy fría de una ciudad norteamericana cuando detectó mi acento y cara latina y preguntó mi procedencia. Le pregunté si creía que Chávez era un buen Presidente; "claro, él consiguió que todos tengamos el mismo pasaporte"; y, ¿eso es muy bueno?, repregunté; "es que mi pasaporte no gusta porque somos muchos ilegales, pero el venezolano es buen pasaporte, así será más fácil que me den la visa".
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Maxim Ross // Eliminemos el rancho
SE ME OCURRE que el mejor mensaje para este último día del año 2004 es este de eliminar el rancho, lo que significa muchas cosas que convienen reeditar y solucionar. Detrás está la convicción de que nuestro país no saldrá adelante hasta que no logre erradicar de raíz ese problema que hunde en la miseria a la gente, pero que alienta a quienes lo enaltecen y uti lizan.
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Carlos Raúl Hernández // Cóncavo y convexo
ENTIERRAN AL FISCAL de la revolución con honores de jefe de Estado y luego el país recibe con asombro la información de que quien hace tres años no tenía dinero ni siquiera para sus traslados habituales por la ciudad, a la hora de su muerte guardaba debajo del colchón una caja chica de mil millones para pagar el condominio, comprar cigarrillos, Coca Cola, pan, leche etc. Las revoluciones depravan el Estado, desaparece la ley y los ciudadanos quedan indefensos frente al gran poder y también al atropello de funcionarios menores. Véalo en el sanchezco episodio de las haciendas en Cojedes.
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Soledad Morillo Belloso // 400 años y tan jovencito
CUMPLIO 400, Y LUCE de estreno por la vida. Hasta hoy, no ha sido su perado.
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Fidel Salgueiro // En el día de los Inocentes
CAMINO POR LAS MERCEDES. En eso me tropiezo, en la entrada de un bar de moda, con una inmensa valla. Es ella, mi chica Polar, la mujer que roba mis sueños. Tan sólo viste un bikini y la acompaña su hermosa cabellera. Esperando encontrarla, me decido a entrar. Bajo las escaleras y allí está ella. Luce esbelta, como siempre, y lo mejor de todo está sola, Chateing no la acompaña. Lleva un conjunto de color verde ceñido, que marca muy bien sus curvas y hace imposible no sentirse cautivado.
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Carlos Zubillaga O. // Peligrosa resignación
EL PAIS HA ENTRADO en una etapa de resignación y contemporización. La clase empresarial en general parece haber decidido adoptar una estrategia de supervivencia, volviendo a su histórica posición de "imparcialidad" política. Es decir, la política tiene el solo objeto de halagar a quienes detentan el poder con el objeto de hacer negocios y evitar agresiones y medidas hostiles.
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COMO ANUNCIAR CON NOSOTROS
Para anunciar en eluniversal.com escríbanos a ***@eluniversal.com. Para mayor información sobre las tarifas de todos nuestros productos, visite http://www.eluniversal.com/anunciantes.
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Este es un servicio gratuito de eluniversal.com, la información viva en tus manos http://www.eluniversal.com

Copyright 2004. Reservados todos los derechos
Política de privacidad | Términos legales | Condiciones de uso


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Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.823 / Virus Database: 561 - Release Date: 12/26/2004
Roy Q.T.
2005-01-02 05:38:41 UTC
Permalink
That's fine, maybe the women should Be Allowed to practice the same
Courting Techniques and Marriage Rights, in the course if time he could
have married several millionaires and saved a bundle., instead of
spending all that money for pretty company.

Then they would be Like the rest of the world.

I Couldn't Envy Him He'd Collapse

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