Discussion:
BANG
(demasiado antiguo para responder)
Juan Rodriguez
2021-04-21 13:01:51 UTC
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General relativity is a theory of gravitation developed by Einstein in the years 1907–1915. The development of general relativity began with the equivalence principle, under which the states of accelerated motion and being at rest in a gravitational field (for example, when standing on the surface of the Earth) are physically identical. The upshot of this is that free fall is inertial motion: an object in free fall is falling because that is how objects move when there is no force being exerted on them, instead of this being due to the force of gravity as is the case in classical mechanics. This is incompatible with classical mechanics and special relativity because in those theories inertially moving objects cannot accelerate with respect to each other, but objects in free fall do so. To resolve this difficulty Einstein first proposed that spacetime is curved. In 1915, he devised the Einstein field equations which relate the curvature of spacetime with the mass, energy, and any momentum within it.
Some of the consequences of general relativity are:
* Gravitational time dilation: Clocks run slower in deeper gravitational wells.[10]
* Precession: Orbits precess in a way unexpected in Newton's theory of gravity. (This has been observed in the orbit of Mercury and in binary pulsars).
* Light deflection: Rays of light bend in the presence of a gravitational field.
* Frame-dragging: Rotating masses "drag along" the spacetime around them.
* Metric expansion of space: the universe is expanding, and the far parts of it are moving away from us faster than the speed of light.
Technically, general relativity is a theory of gravitation whose defining feature is its use of the Einstein field equations. The solutions of the field equations are metric tensors which define the topology of the spacetime and how objects move inertially.

In statistics, the residual sum of squares (RSS), also known as the sum of squared residuals (SSR) or the sum of squared estimate of errors (SSE), is the sum of the squares of residuals (deviations predicted from actual empirical values of data). It is a measure of the discrepancy between the data and an estimation model, such as a linear regression. A small RSS indicates a tight fit of the model to the data. It is used as an optimality criterion in parameter selection and model selection.
In general, total sum of squares = explained sum of squares + residual sum of squares. For a proof of this in the multivariate ordinary least squares (OLS) case, see partitioning in the general OLS model.

At [[e,m],[-e,m],[-e,-m],[e,-m]] c^2= 8.98755179 × 1016 m2 / s2 a machine learning algorithm would intersect the origin at now.


Juan Rodriguez
2021-05-14 19:30:10 UTC
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Post by Juan Rodriguez
General relativity is a theory of gravitation developed by Einstein in the years 1907–1915. The development of general relativity began with the equivalence principle, under which the states of accelerated motion and being at rest in a gravitational field (for example, when standing on the surface of the Earth) are physically identical. The upshot of this is that free fall is inertial motion: an object in free fall is falling because that is how objects move when there is no force being exerted on them, instead of this being due to the force of gravity as is the case in classical mechanics. This is incompatible with classical mechanics and special relativity because in those theories inertially moving objects cannot accelerate with respect to each other, but objects in free fall do so. To resolve this difficulty Einstein first proposed that spacetime is curved. In 1915, he devised the Einstein field equations which relate the curvature of spacetime with the mass, energy, and any momentum within it.
* Gravitational time dilation: Clocks run slower in deeper gravitational wells.[10]
* Precession: Orbits precess in a way unexpected in Newton's theory of gravity. (This has been observed in the orbit of Mercury and in binary pulsars).
* Light deflection: Rays of light bend in the presence of a gravitational field.
* Frame-dragging: Rotating masses "drag along" the spacetime around them.
* Metric expansion of space: the universe is expanding, and the far parts of it are moving away from us faster than the speed of light.
Technically, general relativity is a theory of gravitation whose defining feature is its use of the Einstein field equations. The solutions of the field equations are metric tensors which define the topology of the spacetime and how objects move inertially.
In statistics, the residual sum of squares (RSS), also known as the sum of squared residuals (SSR) or the sum of squared estimate of errors (SSE), is the sum of the squares of residuals (deviations predicted from actual empirical values of data). It is a measure of the discrepancy between the data and an estimation model, such as a linear regression. A small RSS indicates a tight fit of the model to the data. It is used as an optimality criterion in parameter selection and model selection.
In general, total sum of squares = explained sum of squares + residual sum of squares. For a proof of this in the multivariate ordinary least squares (OLS) case, see partitioning in the general OLS model.
At [[e,m],[-e,m],[-e,-m],[e,-m]] c^2= 8.98755179 × 1016 m2 / s2 a machine learning algorithm would intersect the origin at now.
http://youtu.be/qNZ8XCobUUM
My advancement of Einstein‘a theory of relativity using the quadrant method of machine prediction for calculating energy at the dpeed of light suggest my time machine scenario shows Iranians are following a recipe. 8.98755179 × 10^16 must be by unit of measure so 1 kg would be 1 kw in this equation. Going over the logistics of this formula. Just by plugging in the formula using a residual sum of squares formulation of energy and mass there may be a new hypothetical radioactive element predicted named bang. Bang is like mathematical bing: it’s cheap and you just hope it hits like google!

I am assigning a matlab project to find the mysterious bank element by plotting a linear slope through the periodic table of elements:

https://www.mathworks.com/products/matlab.html

https://github.com/pacobaco/ptoe/blob/main/ptoe.csv

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